Sundodger
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Sundodger

Seattle, WA | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF | AFTRA

Seattle, WA | SELF | AFTRA
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jan
25
Sundodger @ Sunset Tavern

Seattle, Washington, United States

Seattle, Washington, United States

Oct
20
Sundodger @ Lucky Liquor

Tukwila, Washington, United States

Tukwila, Washington, United States

Sep
14
Sundodger @ Skylark Cafe & Club

Seattle, Washington, United States

Seattle, Washington, United States

Music

Press


The auditory world of Sundodger from Seattle presents an absolutely stunning amalgamation of classic and contemporary rock. Along with thought provoking lyrics reflecting the trials and tribulations of this modern day world, Sundodger is sure to intrigue all who give a listen to their vibrant tapestries. Bigger Waves is the name of their latest magnum opus, featuring dynamic songs such as Banner Days, Keeping A Light On, and Echoes – an actual grand total of ten songs in all, destined to leave quite an impact on those who encounter these exhilarating reprieves. Highwire Daze Online caught up with Sundodger’s lead vocalist / rhythm guitarist Dan Engel to find out a whole lot more about this dynamic new band on the rise. Read on and discover the Banner Days and Bigger Waves of Sundodger…
Introduce yourself, tell me what you do in Sundodger, and how long the band has been together.
Hi, I’m Dan Engel and I’m the lead singer and play rhythm guitar. We’ve been a band for about 4 years.
Where is Sundodger based out of and what is your local music scene like there?
We’re from Seattle. I probably don’t need to tell you about the Seattle music scene. It’s been in the movies and news. All jokes aside, Seattle has changed a lot as a scene and a music community since the ‘90s. There’s been a huge influx of newcomers to town because of a ton of tech hiring over the last 15 years. So, I suppose it’s probably a lot like what San Francisco went through when all the artists and musicians got priced out of town.
Is there any overall story or concept behind the album title Bigger Waves?
This group of songs have common themes running throughout: relationships, isolation and escape. Technology has tried to make everyone more connected but we’re more isolated than ever. It’s all superficial connection. We want human interaction but have forgotten how to relate to one another. There are terrible consequences to that I think. For those of us lucky enough to finally find a meaningful connection with someone, you almost want to just grab that person’s hand a run away to keep it safe. Those are some of the feelings expressed in the songs.
Select two songs from Bigger Waves and what inspired the lyrics.
The obvious one for me is “Keeping a Light On.” It’s a song I wrote very quickly, and the lyrics came immediately afterward. It’s still a song that gets me emotional if I let it. The lyrics are based on a tragic experience when a friend of the band lost his teenage daughter to a heroin overdose. Having a daughter myself, it was really a gut punch for me when I heard about it. It’s written from a parent’s point of view. So, I tried to imagine what I would feel in that situation and just penned the lyrics.
The other one is probably “Echoes.” It was a song that wasn’t really meant to be a Sundodger song but was recorded very late in the process anyway. It’s kind of a spacey, lonely story about someone who has everything they need or desire at the tips of his fingers. The subject of the song is questioning whether all the technology and communication devices around him have truly made him connected or just totally isolated. You can have anything delivered to your doorstep. You can read anything you want. Watch anything you want. But at the end of the day, you’re just sitting there by yourself staring at a computer. Does that make you happy? I don’t know if it does.
Who designed the cover for Bigger Waves and how much input did you have on it?
My old college roommate Jeremy Salyer designed the cover. I had zero input but he is a fantastic graphic designer and is Creative Director at Never Summer Snowboards in Colorado. He created the image originally for our very first show, years and years ago, so I think it was a surprise to him when we adopted it for the cover.
What could one expect from a live Sundodger show?
If you like guitars, drums and rock music, you’ll like our rock show. We don’t do elaborate theatrics or costumes. We’re a bit of a throwback in that way. The people who like our shows, like live music and seeing musicians play instruments.
Has Sundodger ever played in the Los Angeles/Orange County area or plan to do so in the future?
Never. Would love to if someone would have us. I’ve got family and friends in LA and Long Beach. I love it down there, it’s one of my favorite places in the world.
If Sundodger could open for any band either now or from the past, who would it be and why?
If you ask anyone in the band, you’d probably get four different answers. But for me, it would have to be one of those big stadium rock bands from the ‘70s. I wasn’t alive in their heyday, but I’d have loved to have opened for Led Zeppelin for one of those big, crazy stadium crowds. And then burn one down and watch a John Bonham drum solo.
If the music of Sundodger was a donut, what kind would it be and why?
Maple bar. We smell like a donut and taste like a donut, but we’re not going to be round just because every other fucking donut is round.
What’s up next for Sundodger?
We’re going to continue to play shows and hopefully sell some more records. We’re also writing new songs, so maybe down the line sometime soon we’ll go back into the studio.
Any final words of wisdom?
Go down to the record store today and buy a record. It doesn’t have to be ours, but go buy a record, put it on the record player, look at the album cover, hold it in your hands, and listen.
Sundodger is:
Dan Engel (Vocals, guitar)
Jeff Norman (Guitar)
Don Currie (Bass)
Mark Fiebig(Drums)
(Interview by Ken Morton) - Highwire Daze Magazine


This project from Sundodger brings audiences a fine balance between classic rock and roll, and the perhaps more widely accessible indie-rock anthems of the last twenty years. Too Much Too Soon as an opener lays that foundation well. Short verse lines and a thick, distorted and alternating electric guitar riff pave the way towards a mega hook section that begs for you to join in. The songwriting is on point and the musicianship and structuring represents it well. This track veers off in a naturally artistic manner, leaning on the one hand towards the likes of Led Zeppelin, leaning on the other – during the latter moments – in more of a Pink Floyd direction. At every step it works, it keeps you interested, refusing to fall victim to predictability.
Banner Days follows and sees things move towards the more emotional, softer rock side of life. The vocal drives things but there’s a worthy contrast between the lightness of that and the weight of the guitar sound. You start to form an understanding of the Sundodger approach to creativity. Like Me afterwards keeps the mood reflective and begins with a simple, calming guitar riff. There’s a sudden space within which you can gather your thoughts, the gentler vocal delivery works beautifully and lays bare some poetic lyrics. As things grow, further dashes of passion appear in the piano and the change in melody, as well as the hook concept; it all intrigues.
Shayla turns back towards the memorable anthemic characteristics of mainstream, festival rock. A live show is where this type of track would work wonders. And still, the lyrics are as considerate as ever – unexpected and entrancing in making you want to see the story-line through to the end. Keeping a Light On then creates a more progressive ambiance, reverb-soaked and elevated on its own heartbreaking story-line and emotion than anything else. Epitaph follows and keeps you thinking of these underlying ideas and experiences that make up the project. Music sounds different when there’s depth to it, whether that’s hurt or passion or empowerment, or all of this combined. Epitaph is a brilliant song, the hook has a Foo Fighters feel that just satisfies and screams on your behalf.
Last Stand softens the aura and welcomes back more of an Elbow sound. The music has a fullness, a distant warmth that comforts as its lights flicker in the darkness. Grace after this throws in a simple but effective guitar riff, a back and forth between just a couple of chords – an infectious level of rhythm and an unmissable rhyme-scheme to match. The verses hit harder than the hook section, making for an interesting, unusual structural choice that gives the track a lot of character.
You can really lose yourself in this album as a playlist, the music is thick and loud and lets you escape reality for a while, but at the same time – the songs deal with issues of the heart; things that matter, things that affect people, things that aren’t always talked about. Do No Harm comes in at the right time as you consider this. The melody has a softly haunting presentation, as do the descriptive details within. The band paint a clear picture before you, a story to witness unfolding as the music plays. The hook section is brilliant and breaks the tension in a clever way.
Echoes finishes things up with a gentle touch of acoustic honesty. There’s something very raw and gritty about this final song. The vocalist feels as if he’s right there in the room with you – the volume has fallen away, things are more discreet and even slightly vulnerable. You connect with the band here, but there’s also a clear level of anticipation about how it all sounds as it pours through. It’s not quite the resolving, door-closing finish you might expect, but it leaves you feeling thoughtful and intrigued – enough so to go back and listen to the playlist once or twice more.
Find & follow Sundodger on Facebook. - Stereo Stickman


Music is a powerful force that artists have been trying to find a way to harness and tame since the very beginning of time itself. Music can be powerful in many ways. There are lyrics that can change our entire perspective on life and the people living it. There are medleys that can capture the very essence of seasons changing. In the first fifty years following the dawn of the recording age, music both soundtracked and soothed the evils and tragedy of a world at war. And in just this last half century, we’ve seen rock band’s that left audiences completely hypnotized and spellbound by their massive, overpowering volume that rivaled the sonic weight of ten million screaming voices. Continuing the tradition of compelling the masses to stand together and unite as one beneath the shelter of earthquake inducing bass matched by unholy guitar virtuosity today are the dedicated musicians who comprise Sundodger, a Washington state indie rock band who shy away from monikers and comparisons in favor of staying focused on their music and the unstoppable vigor that inspires it.
Sundodger have a new record out this year titled Bigger Waves, a fitting description of both the album’s narrative and the band’s philosophy on making rock music in general. Bigger Waves isn’t an indie record that hipsters are going to get excited about, and it definitely isn’t a mature rock album that leans more on country-styled song structures more than it does old fashioned bluesy grit. Bigger Waves is just one gigantic tidal wave after another of bruising, hostile rock riffs that are sometimes accompanied by affectionate harmonies and other times so brutally devised that the melody is generated from the intensity of the pace rather than the compassion of the vocalist. In both cases, the concept not only works, it leaves a devastating trail of haunting smoke in its path. Even in the moments when this album draws close to being too strong, it’s still more inviting than anything else I’ve heard in a long time.
Sundodger are the kind of band that make me want to get out and see some live music immediately when I listen to them. To hear this kind of spirit in such a modestly put together unit, this kind of tenacity from a band that doesn’t ask for much other than a platform to distribute its message of individuality and collective strength, it’s simply inspiring. Bigger Waves is almost like a playbill telling us what to expect when we hit whatever packed club that Sundodger has booked next in their touring schedule, and it’s a show that is awfully hard to resist when given the opportunity to see it. Bigger Waves gets my endorsement for most exciting rock album of 2018 and most invigoratingly action-filled record that I’ve reviewed in the last two years by far, and I would encourage anyone who loves the energy of a truly connective rock n’ roll experience make a point in seeing them in person at the soonest possible date.

Lloyd Bear - Music Existence


Sundodger releases LP
BANDCAMP: https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Along Seattle’s Fremont Cut, there’s a recording studio known as Studio Lithio. First put into operation under the command of Pearl Jam’s Stone Gossard in 1995. Studio Lithio has seen a lot of talent come in and out in hopes of recording something significant and impactful. Recently, Seattle’s Sundodger passed through and recorded their debut full length album Bigger Waves, and while the band was clearly ready for the next phase of their career, it was all too magical that Studio Lithio be where that next phase would be born. In the spirit of the Seattle scene’s legendary forerunners, Sundodger channels pure amplifier carnage in Bigger Waves that doesn’t just shake your stereo but stimulates your musical intellect as well.
In this business, there are professionals and there’s everyone else, and more often than not it’s the “everyone else” that receives more attention than they’re really due. Sundodger hasn't concerned themselves with getting a ton of exposure outside of their own scene. But that’s where they are special. Sundodger isn't interested in taking the easy way out, and Bigger Waves showcases this more than anything. The music is the priority and everything else comes second.
Under these ethics, Bigger Waves comes together fusing DIY ethos with a lust for volume-cranked, high energy rock. Sundodger blows the paint off the walls with this record, but don’t use much bravado to get the message across. If frills are what you’re looking for in a rock record, Bigger Waves isn’t one that I would recommend to you. But, if you’re more interested in music that doesn’t have time to pack on much fat before delivering a clobbering melodic punch, this might be a little more up your alley.
Songs like “Epitaph” and “Do No Harm” aren’t your typical contemporary radio-ready singles, yet they show off a charming dark wit that has been sorely desired in pop music by both critics and audiences alike for the past decade. “Keeping a Light On” was my favorite song from Bigger Waves not because of its infectiously groove-laden hook, but because of its depth of perception, lyrically and sonically. One thing that every track on Bigger Waves has in common is their ability to leave us shaken and roused from any disinterested boredom we might have felt prior to listening.
Bigger Waves is a sprawling, attention-getting full length album that requires a lot of focus to breakdown but relentlessly draws us closer to its ethereal, glowing core of craftsmanship. Sundodger might not be a band that a lot of listeners outside of Washington state are familiar with, but something tells me that this record could go a long way towards changing that. From coast to coast, Americans have been demanding a fresh start for rock music in the 21st century, and to be honest, no one I’ve reviewed lately shows as much devotion to the genre as Sundodger.
Mindy McCall - No Depression


AIMING TO PUT THE DANGER BACK IN ROCK N’ ROLL SEATTLE’S SUNDODGER AMPS UP FOR SOME ‘BIGGER WAVES’ ON THEIR HIGH-POWERED FULL LENGTH DEBUT
‘Bigger Waves’ by Sundodger is introspective, bright and edgy, it draws from the heyday of Alternative, from the Great North West’s Seattle Legends of old, yet is also fresh and enlightened, uplifting and spiritual. Melodic and hypnotizing, with songs that run up and down the spine, from soft and hypnotic to rough and “Rock Edgy”, Sundodger has an album that will definitely make heads spin on and off the dance floor, an album with great promise.

Dan Engel, multi-talented frontman and guitarist for emerging Seattle powerhouse band Sundodger, says the easiest thing for him, band co-founder Jeff Norman (guitar) and their groove intensive rhythm section (bassist Don Currie, drummer Mark Fiebig) to do would be to write music that fits in nicely into the mainstream rock we’re hearing today. “But nobody would stomach that,” Engel adds. “Music today is very safe, no pointy edges, and would go very nicely on a mobile phone or Corona commercial. We would love to see a little danger put back into rock n roll.”

Taking raucous and lyrically provocative action in that direction, Sundodger creates intense AOR rock for our era, fusing classic guitar rock edged with punk and new wave on their full length debut Bigger Waves. Released both on vinyl (the ultimate reflection of its classic rock roots) and digitally, the compelling 10 track collection was recorded at Studio Litho with the help of producer/engineer Shawn Simmons, who has been behind the boards for Northwest heavyweights like Head and the Heart, My Goodness and Lemelo. The tracks were mastered in Seattle by Ed Brooks (Resonant Mastering); lacquer was cut by Levi Seitz (Black Belt Mastering).
Though Bigger Waves is the band’s full length debut with Sundodger’s current lineup, it is technically a follow-up to the band’s 2014 EP Home, which featured Engel on drums and rhythm guitar, Norman on lead guitar and a guest overdubbing the bass parts. As such, Bigger Waves reflects their exciting evolution and the natural chemistry that happens when a developing band hits its stride with the right lineup. Currie and Fiebig, who joined in 2016, have known each other since high school and were previously in a Seattle group called Betty Ford Falcons.

“We really took our time with Bigger Waves, a year and a half from end to end,” he adds. “We are a much closer band after going through that process. We had all the blowout fights and stuff like that and got through it – all of which has made us better musicians and people. Sonically, we did a lot of experimenting with guitar tones, vocals and for the first time brought keyboards into the mix. The result is a cohesive collection of song that will take listeners on a journey, rather than just a list of disparate tracks.”

That fascinating trip deals in depth with relationships and working through the difficulties that are always part of them – with offbeat, sometimes non-linear, Cobain-esque lyrics that can be unlocked from different angles. “Banner Days” is a high energy, autobiographical reflection on the ups and downs Engel and his wife have gone through over the years, financially and emotionally, and how that’s made them stronger. “Like Me”, whose cool dynamic includes hypnotic keyboard elements, is Engel’s favorite tune, a tale of two flawed individuals who break out of their individual isolations when they find each other. “Echoes” and “Epitaph” coincidentally dovetail thematically into each other. Both invoke the dual realities of reliance and isolation in our device dependent world. “Echoes” tackles the irony of being able to do so much but not really accomplishing anything with those capabilities, while “Epitaph” is a more hard-hitting, destructive result of making online connections that seem more real than they actually are.
The roots of Sundodger extend back to the 90s, when Engel and Norman formed the band Divided Sky after they met in college. With Engel on drums, the band released two CDs and toured around the Pacific Northwest. Years after a mutual burnout found the two pursuing music related career endeavors apart from the band grind, they reunited as Divided Sky for a few shows and rekindled the old creative spark and decided to write new material (with Engel on vocals and guitar) – which led to the formation of Sundodger.

“I think the style of music we play comes from us just having been musicians for a long time and understanding the only thing that will really resonant with a listener is if the art you create is honest,” Engel says. “And we all listen to different genres and are influenced as such. The common string throughout the bands we love is that those bands did what they wanted with their art. Especially punk rock. That DIY and F you I’m going to do what I want has always been thrilling for me.”

http://www.sundodgerband.com
http://sundodger.bandcamp.com
http://www.facebook.com/sundodgerband
http://www.instagram.com/sundodgerband - IndiePulse Music


Got in this amazing album from Seattle-based Sundodger and it’s making me feel all the feels, wrapped up in good vibes. If you know me, you know I’ve been going through a rough time recently—things are just now getting better, and I’m kicking myself for not listening to this submission sooner.
I’m just going to go ahead and say it, there is still very much a Seattle sound. Every band I come across from Seattle, regardless of their genre, still has that Seattle grunge aesthetic that the city can’t get away from, and I think that’s a good thing. You really hear its influence in Sundodger’s music. But they still make it their own.
Admittedly, the track “Like Me” is my favorite on the album and I must say, it’s a lot slower than I tend to go for. But maybe when times are tough, slowing it down just a bit can be a good thing.
Whether you’re in the dumps or having a good day, Sundodger’s Bigger Waves has something for everyone. As long as you like your rock with a side of grunge xo. - Left Bank Magazine


Dan Engel and Jeff Norman—co-founders of Seattle, Washington’s indie-rock quartet, Sundodger—go way back. During their college days in the 90’s, the two formed, Divided Sky, a group which toured the Pacific Northwest for a time, until road-burnout inevitably occurred.
Years later, they both caught that contagious ole’ musical itch once again, eventually succumbing and becoming, Sundodger. Recruiting a couple more fellas, the band’s current iteration consists of Dan Engel (vocals, guitar), Jeff Norman (guitar), Don Currie (bass), and Mark Fiebig (drums).
And, following-up to the band’s 2014 EP Home, is their latest project, Bigger Waves, an album dedicated to the iconic challenges associated with “the relationship”, which took a year and a half to complete.

“Music today is very safe, no pointy edges, and would go very nicely on a mobile phone or Corona commercial. We would love to see a little danger put back into rock’n’roll.”
—Dan Engel, Sundodger

The album’s seventh track, Last Stand, is an instant throwback to the great mid-90’s college-rock era. Ambient, airy electric chords are joined by a crisp and minimalist rhythm section, substantive and nostalgic lyrics, and two tasteful guitar solos (particularity the 2nd solo at the 3:00 mark), in this dedication to the notion that anything is possible, always. Congrats boys, this is a really cool track…
“You grab the case
And we’ll hit the road
What we will find
No one will know…”
WHOSE LOVECHILD…?
Big Head Todd and the Monsters meets Cool For August…
BELOW: Listen to Sundodger’s single, Last Stand, and connect with their social media platforms. Please support Sundodger by visiting them online, and playing, downloading, and/or purchasing their music, or attending a live show! And, as always, thank you for supporting real music! - The Ark of Music


arnestness is defined as seriousness in intention, purpose or effort, and such depth and sincerity of feeling comes through loud and clear throughout Sundodger’s full-length album, Bigger Waves.
The band is from Seattle and is led by Dan Engel. Although Seattle gained a reputation for being the grunge music capital many years ago, you won’t likely hear many elements from that error coursing through these twelve rock tracks. Nevertheless, Engel’s vocals on “Epitaph” take on an especially Dave Grohl-like growl during the tune’s chorus. When the song gets to its dual-guitar guitar solo, though, we immediately know we’re not in Foo Fighter country any more.
Engel expresses a gentler side with “Grace.” It’s one of those songs that references its title lyrically (“Grace”), without actually using that title word in its lyric. The guitar part is slightly jangly and reminds one of the kind of music R.E.M. created during its commercial heyday.
Stream: https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Sundodger closes the album with “Echoes,” which expresses loneliness. “There’s a wall of TVs/I see what I please,” begins one of the song’s verses. It’s, sadly, a song about having everything and nothing. He has TVs with which to watch anything he likes. He has a pot on the stove, but there’s nobody else to feed. Much like Bruise Springsteen’s “57 Channels and Nothing On,” this song speaks to America’s embarrassment of riches. We have nearly everything we could ever want, materially, yet we’re still feeling lonely and bored. How can this happen? Well, it starts with depending upon material things that only flesh and blood can provide. It also recalls the Replacements’ “Answering Machine,” when Paul Westerberg cries, “How do you say goodnight to an answering machine?” Technology, once again, lets us down.
Another instance where Sundodger’s sound differs distinctly from atypical Seattle sounds is on album opener “Too Much Too Soon,” where the song goes into a moody, Pink Floyd-like bridge section. The guitars take on a David Gilmour vibe, which nicely brings that iconic progressive act to mind.
The album’s title appears in a track called “Banner Days.” It’s another sort of downer song. The chorus is sung with a palpable sense of resignation. “Banner days passed us by/Bigger waves left us dry.” One can’t help but imagine these words are describing Sundodger’s career arc. Even though the band is relatively young, the shelf lives for rock & roll acts can be extremely short. It could also be about coming along at the wrong time. Perhaps the group is looking back to some of its sonic inspirations, such as R.E.M., and wishing it could have been around when rock & roll was more exciting. Back during R.E.M.’s heyday, college rock was the in thing. Bands were discovering alternate roots to success. The whole term of alternative rock was still new. These days, rock & roll is akin to one of music’s endangered species. Sundodger might have had a better chance of breaking through, back when rock & roll success stories were more prevalent.
At a time when Cardi B is the unworthy queen of pop, an earnest band like Sundodger must feel out of place. Those that appreciate its sincerity, though, will find a place for “Bigger Waves” in their hearts.
https://www.facebook.com/sundodgerband
-Dan MacIntosh - Skope Magazine


Band: Sundodger: Dan Engel: vocals, lyrics and rhythm guitar; Jeff Norman: lead guitar; Don Currie: bass guitar; and Mark Fiebig: drums and percussion

Album: ‘Bigger Waves’
Produced by: Sundodger and Shawn Simmons; Engineered by: Simmons; Assistant Engineer: Jon Roberts; Recorded and mixed at Studio Litho in Seattle in 2017-2018; Mastered by: Ed Brooks at Resonant Mastering in Seattle
Taking provocative risks that contemplate people’s personal evolution, as well as the natural chemistry that happens with those friends and colleagues they feel truly connected to, isn’t always an easy journey. But emerging Seattle rock band, Sundodger, which is led by singer-songwriter, Dan Engel, is powerfully doing just that with their intense new album, ‘Bigger Waves.’ The newly released 10-track project, which marks the full-length record debut of the group’s current line-up, includes authentic themes about the harrowing process of people discovering who they truly are that will surely resonate with many listeners.
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‘Bigger Waves’ immediately starts taking its listeners on a reflective journey that offers an in-depth exploration into the equally joyful and difficult process of making a relationship work. In what becomes Sundodger’s signature vocal style, the offbeat and sometimes non-linear, Cobain-esque lyrics are instantly showcased on the record’s initial entry, ‘Too Much Too Soon.’ Backed by a classic rock guitar, Engel stunningly sings about how the person he’s connected to puts on a fake act that doesn’t suit his needs and wants in a relationship.
The sophomore song on ‘Bigger Waves,’ ‘Banner Days,’ is one of the band’s best efforts. Naturally blending of several different musical styles, including soul and rock, Engel croons about how he has been changed by his environment and the situations he has faced. The singer’s high energy and autobiographical reflection on the ups and downs that he and his wife have gone through over the years, both financially and emotionally, crafts a stunning anthem about the bond of marriage. He also emotionally admits that his title banner days have passed him by, but he doesn’t have any regrets.
The next track on Sundodger’s new album is ‘Like Me,’ which features hypnotic keyboard elements, and chronicles the emotional journey of two flawed people who break out of their individual isolation when they find each other. The tune is grippingly driven by slower tempo guitar riffs and drum beats that take cues from classic 1990s rock songs.

‘Like Me’ then delves into the punk and new wave-driven track, ‘Shayla,’ which features a strong, driving pace that’s fueled by the bass and electric guitars, as well as the drums. The energetic and up tempo vibe, which makes the song a prime candidate to be a commercial hit, alluringly notes how Engel wants to get lost with the title woman.
‘Bigger Waves’ then transitions into the rock-inspired entry, ‘Keeping a Light On,’ which also as the potential to be a commercial radio hit. Engel emotionally contemplates how he can no longer be with the woman he loves, as the door has closed on their relationship.
‘Keeping a Light On’ is followed by another one of the best songs on ‘Bigger Waves,’ which is titled ‘Epitaph.’ The intense rock-n-roll and punk track, which is influenced by such bands as The Ramones and Green Day, is one of the strongest ones on Sundodger’s new record. Backed by upbeat rock guitars, the tune invoke the reality of the isolation that’s a stunning effect of the reliance people have on their devices. ‘Epitaph’ also chronicles the destructive result of making online connections that seem more real than they actually are.
The next entry on Sundodger’s new record is ‘Last Stand,’ which features wailing, sentimental and thought-provoking rock guitars and vocals. Engel has a determined attitude about needing to spend time with the person in his life, in order to see if they have a true connection.
‘Last Stand’ then delves into the ’70s alternative rock-inspired song, ‘Grace,’ on which Engle croons that he’s testing the time he has with the woman in his life. While ‘Grace’ is unfortunately one of the more forgettable tracks on ‘Biggest Wave,’ Sundodger quickly returns to form with the record’s nextenthralling rock tune, ‘Do No Harm.’
‘Biggest Waves’ penultimate entry chronicles how a young girl’s world is so unclear and scattered, many people begin to wait to see her fall. But she has found a way to win, which is chronicled in the lyrics that contemplate her life path and interactions.
‘Do No Harm’ then transitions into the last song on ‘Biggest Wave,’ which is titled ‘Echoes.’ The track creates a slow, rock-infused atmosphere that perfectly sums up the band’s collective musical vibe. Driven by a soulful guitar, Engel emotionally croons how life fuels his fears while he ponders what’s going on around him. The tune also explores the irony of being able to do so much but not really accomplishing anything, especially in the current world that’s driven by people’s reliance on technology.
Engaging in brazen risks that contemplate people’s personal evolution, as well as the natural chemistry that happens with those friends and colleagues they feel truly connected to, isn’t always an easy journey. But Sundodger is powerfully doing just that with its intense new album. ‘Bigger Waves’ features authentic themes about the harrowing process of people discovering who they truly are that will surely resonate with many listeners.
For more information on Sundodger, visit the band’s Facebook page. - Shock Ya!


Sundodger is an album-oriented rock band. They blend classic guitar rock with elements of punk and new wave to produce a unique sound.
Sundodger is a talented local band that blends straightforward, well-crafted, guitar-driven songs while leaning on a simple but powerful songwriting style. They have a sound that would fit as well in the 1970s as it does today and although they drift on the easier side of the rock genre, at times on the latest release they kick things up a notch and demonstrate their punk and/or hard rock chops. Check out their latest release HERE and we’re fairly confident you’ll become a fan. - Northwest Music Scene


For as much creativity and immersive artistry that has emerged in the last decade, one aspect of the entertainment business has continued to suffer, almost, ironically, in silence. I’m talking about pop music, specifically it’s more electrified rock n’ roll realm. Pop’s heavier side has been going through some particularly rough times since the fusion of electronic and urban subgenres to create super-scenes that know no boundaries both sonically and geographically. While this has undeniably been good for music as a whole, it’s stamped out the flame that once burned within rock music. But this year, with their new album Bigger Waves, Seattle’s Sundodger are reigniting that flame with a passion that is unparalleled in all of music today.
Bigger Waves is classic, dirty Seattle garage rock pumped out at maximum volume with more low-end than more bands are comfortable unleashing. I definitely wouldn’t call this post-grunge, but it’s still under the larger umbrella of alternative rock itself. When listening, what I gathered from both its presentation and the design of the band’s songs more than anything else was that old school, classic rock vibe almost being re-imagined to suit today’s modern day sound and format.
It would be wrong for me not to acknowledge the fact that despite pop’s general marginalization of rock, there have still been bands working to keep rock music’s identity and devotion to distortion alive, it’s just that none of them have been doing it as well as Sundodger does. This is a truly airtight collection of solid, hard rocking jams, but there is one thing that is absent from Bigger Waves that is overwhelmingly noticeable. There aren’t any stupid, predictable metaphors. While many of their contemporaries have been content to celebrate the one aspect of rock music that has always hurt its aesthetic – big ego – Sundodger in this instance has evolved ahead of the curve.
Mainstream radio needs more rock music made in this decade, not by a bands that rely more on computer software than they do actual instruments. Sundodger have stayed loyal to the ethics and way of life that made the greatest albums of all-time as great as they are. All it takes is some people who share a dream and a vision of how to get there, some solid body guitars, a drum kit and a bass to cement everything together.
It might not seem like it to some, but I think that Sundodger meant to send a clear message to the world with Bigger Waves. That message is, in essence; look out, we are the new face of Seattle, the new sound of rock music. It’s a lot to live up to, but Sundodger are off to a pretty excellent start.
BANDCAMP: https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Kim Muncie - NeuFutur


Seattle, Washington-based Sundodger is a band that combines elements of seventies Rock and Roll and some modern-day influences to form a style of Rock and Roll that is easily timeless. The band Sundodger is comprised of: Dan Engel – Vocals, rhythm guitar; Jeff Norman – Lead guitar; Don Currie – Bass guitar and Mark Fiebig – Drums, percussion. Together, the band has created several albums of music with the newest one being called Bigger Waves.
Bigger Waves from Sundodger begins with the track “Too Much Too Soon”. The track begins right off with a strong guitar part. That guitar part gives the track a Classic Rock feel. Soon, however, the refrain of the song gives the track a much more modern feel. The track continues to move along and change as it goes. As it moves along, the band’s music even gives off a little Pink Floyd feel to it. The different elements in the track give the song a style that will grab the attention of Rock and Roll lovers, no matter what style of the genre they happen to gravitate towards.
As “Too Much Too Soon” comes to an end, the track “Banner Days” begins. And just like with the previous song, “Banner Days” contains several different musical feelings. However, as “Too Much Too Soon” contains an ever-changing feel to the music, “Banner Days” seems to contain several different musical elements all at the same time. The blending of several different musical styles within the entire length of the track means the listener can hear different influences all at once. “Banner Days” is easily one of the strongest songs on the release.
Sundodger continues their new release with the track “Shayla”. Lying somewhere between Punk and New Wave, the track “Shayla” comes across as a Green Day song with just a little eighties British influence to the music. The track features a strong, driving pace to the music courtesy of the bass and drums with a strong electric guitar presence that gives the track plenty of energy. The reverb that comes from the guitar even adds a touch of depth to the music. “Shayla” feels as if it would have been right at home on the radio back in the nineties but is still fresh enough to feel at home on today’s Rock formats.
The band takes their music in a slightly different direction on the track “Keeping a Light On”. Where the previous track makes good use of the band’s Punk influences, “Keeping a Light On” seems to find the band blend some U2 influence into their sound. While the song doesn’t feel like a direction copy of U2’s style, the influence is strong enough to be evident as you listen. The track features a strong Rock and Roll feel with a modern-day British influence. Together, the track feels readymade for today’s Top 40 radio formats.
With the song “Epitaph,” the band raises the intensity within their music. The stronger Rock and Roll that is present on the track raises the energy level on the album. While the song “Shayla” feels rather Green Day-ish, “Epitaph” from Sundodger seems as if the band took a hidden influence from a band like The Ramones and added it into their music that already has plenty of depth to it. With the influence from The Ramones, “Epitaph” is one of the loudest, strongest tracks on the entire release.
On the next song called “Grace,” the track begins with a musical approach that brings to mind the music of Supertramp’s “Give a Little Bit” before the band truly launches the song. While “Give a Little Bit” found its way onto radio back in the seventies, the rest of the track contains a strong Alternative Rock approach that would have been right at home on radio back in the nineties.
Bigger Waves, the new release from Sundodger, comes to a close with the track “Echoes”. For the final track of their album, the band seems to have slipped back in time to the seventies. “Echoes” is a track that will easily conjure up visions of Pink Floyd as the track contains the same feel as many of the songs that Floyd has produced over the years. Along with a slow, easy feel to the music, the song also contains some production value that adds some atmosphere to the track, which was helped along with the addition of Don Currie who played The Mellotron electro-mechanical keyboard. That atmospheric addition to the track helps bring out the Pink Floyd influence in the band’s music.
Sundodger’s newest album called Bigger Waves is the first album from the band that has been released on vinyl as well as digitally. If you are a fan of records, this is your chance to add a solid release to your music collection on record.
To hear the music of Sundodger, check out the song “Too Much Too Soon“. - The Rock and Roll Report


Sundodger is making Bigger Waves
BANDCAMP: https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Debut albums are a difficult task for any band to tackle, regardless of skill level or experience on the stage. For Sundodger, their rookie LP Bigger Waves was no different, but when you listen to just the opening bars of the “Too Much Too Soon,” the first track of the record, it becomes clear that all of the time, energy, sweat and passion poured into the process was well worth it. From the stellar showmanship on the guitar to the swaggering basslines that drive it, “Too Much Too Soon” sets the tone for what will ultimately be a journey into the divine sonic realm that Sundodger dwells in and dominates.
“Banner Days” doesn’t fall short in keeping the tempo moving as we settle into the foundations of Bigger Waves, pushing a rollicking, almost drone like wall of sound through stereo speakers like a glassy fog. The bittersweet “Like Me” isn’t far off from rivaling its gravity and tonality, but there is a certain stop-start nuance between the tracks that almost suggests a shift of gears from song to song. Rather than this making the music harder to digest in one sitting, this dynamic adds a colorful diversity to the album that isn’t super common for album oriented rock bands but can frequently be found in more avant-garde, ambient-minded recordings that may well have influenced the creative approach of Sundodger.
“Epitaph” cuts into the middle of Bigger Waves and contributes a bit of humility to an otherwise serious, straightforward collection of songs that don’t beg for much other than distorted crunch and elegantly stylized lyricism, which is all that any fan of visceral rock could ever ask for. “Last Stand” deflates the tension to a more soothing level but doesn’t evaporate the energy that makes this record such a fun, captivating listen from beginning to end. Both in the first and second halves of Bigger Waves, there’s a constricting scoop through the middle of the EQ that dispels any idea of getting distracted from Sundodger’s divine expressions, no matter how big and boisterous they may, and unavoidably do, become. Some casual listeners might find this element of the production jarring, but for rock enthusiasts like myself, it really doesn’t get much better than this.
It is not until we reach the conclusion of Bigger Waves, which comes in the form of the somber, detracted “Echoes,” that the electricity of the album in its entirety starts to really leave a lasting, haunting mark on us. Like a slow acting poison, we don’t realize what we’ve ingested until it’s too late, and now there’s nothing that we can do to prevent its long-term effects from affecting our lives. Sundodger is a group that I’ve been following for a hot minute, but it wasn’t until this album that I realized just how incredibly talented they are both as musicians and as articulaters of artistry. Bigger Waves might not be the genre-defying, earth-shattering rock album that some critics might have told you is in high demand in 2018 – but what it is really could be what our pop culture has been yearning for now for over a decade. Real, unfiltered, unadulterated rock, in all of its raw, organic authenticity. - The Indie Source


BANDCAMP: https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Seattle. With just one mention of the city, music fans are instantly filled with images of iconic 90’s pop culture. The city’s insular underground music scene broke into the mainstream at the turn of the decade and hasn’t stopped producing thoughtful, poignant work ever since. Whether it be in grunge, jazz, hip-hop, noise music, garage rock or anything else, you’re bound to find it in the queen city of the Pacific Northwest, and recently I happened to come upon one of the more exciting acts out of the 206 that I’ve heard in sometime. Sundodger are every bit the stylish rock band that you would expect to emerge from the West Coast, but in their new album Bigger Waves, we’re treated to something far more transcendent than your typical rip-roar heavy rock group.
Bigger Waves starts off drenched in fuzz with the raucous “Too Much Too Soon,” which adequately sets the pace for this tightly wound collection of primal rock catharsis. There’s a rebellious, somewhat punk rock-influenced demeanor to this track and the bulk of Bigger Waves, but there isn’t any of the self-righteousness that has become associated with (and unfortunately plagued) post-hipster alternative acts. A smoothness guides us from song to song in the style of a progressive rock album, but the stripped down nature of the music dilutes any sort of overindulgence that could become an issue with an album as ambitious as this. “Like Me” is a good example of stylized rock at its finest, while “Last Stand” serves to highlight all of Sundodger’s carefully balanced musicianship.
There are opportunities in this record for the band to go off the rails. The giant riffage that is embedded into the whole of Bigger Waves would certainly be a lot more devastatingly impactful in a live setting, but nonetheless the energy of a stellar stage show is captured in these ten tracks without becoming overwhelming or suffocating. I’m actually of the opinion that the studio is where a band like Sundodger are able to explore all of their capabilities without restriction more than anyplace else. Bigger Waves, in that sense, is a glimpse deep inside the minds of the talented musicians who made it, albeit a brilliantly overdriven one.
I highly recommend that rock fans, specifically of the college radio persuasion, take a close look at what Sundodger is doing for music at the moment. Their approach is simple, their music mammoth. Sundodger is making unpolished, unrestricted rock that is as unforgiving and hazy as the city that they call home, and among all of the trash that currently pollutes FM radio waves, their sound stands apart as both unique and addictively accessible. I look forward to seeing what else they produce in the years to come.
Sebastian Cole - Gashouse Radio


BANDCAMP: https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Somewhere in the last 20 years, western society seemed to lose sight of what rock n’ roll really meant and represented. It’s been a strange time; we’ve seen rock music at its purest and most vulnerable form explode into the mainstream, fall once more into stagnation, receive a cosmetic makeover via technology, again stagnate, and now reach a creative fork where every possible accent has been added to its textured tapestry in hopes of revitalizing whatever innovative energy once spawned its very existence in the first place. It has been said, by pretty much every critic, that 2018 is representative of a very important turning point in the history of rock n’ roll, and while some are content to rue over the loss of archaic ways of shaking the floorboards and getting people moving to the beat, others are striving forward in search of futuristic greatness, the likes of which none of us has ever been privy too. You could say that Seattle-based alt rockers Sundodger are firmly planted in the latter category, and I still don’t think that would be giving their independent spirit the credit that it really deserves.
Sundodger’s new record Bigger Waves isn’t a crossover record by any stretch of the imagination. There aren’t any guest appearances from genre-bending rappers or lyrics written by suicidal, autocratic A&R reps. There’s just a band, the riffs they dispatch, and the trail of smoke that they leave in their wake. Bigger Waves is a pretty trimmed record for the amount of distorted, earthquake style bass and drum chaos that it packs, but I’ve always been of the opinion that music this large doesn’t need a lot of primer to get us to where we need to be to connect with it on both an emotional and a physical level. Bigger Waves doesn’t give you much of a choice but to embrace the girth of its power.
One of my biggest complaints about contemporary rock bands is that their vanity, or rather their flaccid attempts at concealing it, gets in the way of delivering the music at its true capacity. This isn’t something that I’ve encountered listening to Sundodger, despite the fact that they’re coming out of a scene that I have come to detest for its two-faced lack of values in the new millennium. Maybe Sundodger holds a little bit of hope for the city that they hail from, but moreover, maybe they hold hope for anyone who is a fan of uncut rock music that doesn’t adhere to the rules and regulations of commercialized pop. Bigger Waves, and more specifically songs like the captivating “Banner Days” and “Echoes,” tell me that there is plenty of good stuff to look forward to in the future of rock n’ roll as long as these guys are in the game, and from where I’m sitting, it certainly doesn’t look like this band is going to be departing the pop culture spectrum anytime soon. If I had the kind of buzz surrounding my work as they do theirs, I wouldn’t be going anywhere either.
Heather Savage - Razorfish


@skopemag Feature Q&A Featuring Sundodger
by Skope • June 21, 2018

So we are so excited to have Sundodger here on @skopemag on this first day of summer 2018. This is the longest day of the year so we have enoigh time to read and listen to this awesome band. Sundodger is a Seattle-based album oriented rock band. They blend classic guitar rock with elements of punk and new wave to create a unique sound. They have so much going on so lets jump right in.
Hi Dan, welcome to Skope Magazine. How have you been?
Been great, but really busy getting ready for our record release on July 3rd. We’ve got a limited amount of vinyl that we’ve pressed, so we’re really excited about that.
Can you talk to us more about your song/single Like Me?
It was a song I wrote a couple years ago and it actually took some time for the other guys to understand what the hell I was trying to do. It’s oddly constructed with some strange chord changes, which was probably the main problem. Lyrically, it’s really kind of a love song about two flawed people who want to escape to a better place. They have aspirations and dreams but are wary about how to do it.
Is the song posted on Youtube, Spotify, Soundcloud, etc so we can hear it?
We’ve got it up on our BandCamp site, which you can get to at – https://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/bigger-waves
Did any event in particular inspire you to write this song?
There wasn’t a specific event, but it was written in two parts. For most of the songs on the record, I brought in a rough sketch for us to flesh out as a band, which we did with Like Me. But when we got into the studio and recorded it, I felt the song was missing something. So, we tinkered with an additional lead guitar part, which Jeff wrote and recorded in the studio, but I felt it was still incomplete. I asked a friend of mine Patrick Porter if he could listen to the song and write a piano part. When I went over to his house and he played the part to me, I knew that we had the missing thing that was going to complete the song. It was the first time we used keyboards on any song, but I think it turned out great. It led to us using more keys on other songs like Banner Days and Echoes.
Any plans to release a video for the track?
We’d like to do a video, but we’ve been so focused on producing the record on vinyl that those sort of things have taken a bit of a back seat. It’s not really something we particularly like doing. Lip syncing your own song and mugging in front of a camera isn’t our thing. I know it’s counter-intuitive to self-promotion, but fuck it. Maybe if we don’t have to be in it… like an animation video or something? If anyone wants to help, give me a call!
The single comes off your new record – what’s the story behind the title?
The title “Bigger Waves” is a lyric in the song Banner Days and Mark felt it was apropos for the record album title. The song Banner Bays is a bitter/sweet song that’s both hopefully and somewhat melancholy. And depending on your point of view or circumstance, Bigger Waves can be a good thing or a bad thing.
How was the recording and writing process?
We did all the recording at Studio Litho in Seattle. Shawn Simmons produced and engineered the project and was instrumental in helping us define the sound and tenor of the record. We really took our time in the studio. Off and on, it took about a year to record, mix and master. I’d love to say we’re the kind of band that can go into the studio over a weekend and knock out 10 ready to go songs, but that’s not us. We had 9 songs that were done and ready to record, but once we got into the studio we all started hearing areas where we could add new parts. It was exciting to be creative in that way but it did extend the process. Echoes, the last song on the record, was written and recorded last. It really wasn’t meant to be a Sundodger song, but Jeff thought it should be included. So, I decided to record it live in the stairwell at Studio Litho on Shawn’s acoustic guitar and see how it turned out. Don added some cool stuff on the Mellotron keyboard and it became this really interesting and different song really quickly.
Known for playing with different genres – how do you get to balance them together?
We’re far removed from our 20s, so I think there is less pressure to conform or feel like you need to fit into a certain pocket. We just don’t give a shit. We have influences that span the musical spectrum from Jazz, Metal, New Wave, Rock and Folk. It’s all goodness. As long as it’s authentic and heart-felt, you’ll achieve whatever your art is driving toward.
Where did you find the inspiration for the songs and lyrics?
The tunes are born from just sitting down in front of an instrument and trying to create something that makes you feel something. For me personally, I usually get to the point where I can’t leave the spot I’m in until the song is complete. There’s a real urgency, almost paranoia for me until I have it down and demoed out. When you latch on to something, the song writes itself. This group of songs have common themes running throughout: relationships, isolation and escape. Technology has tried to make everyone more connected but we’re more isolated than ever. It’s all superficial connection. We want human interaction but have forgotten how to relate to one another. There are terrible consequences to that I think. For those of us lucky enough to finally find a meaningful connection with someone, you almost want to just grab that person’s hand a run away to keep it safe. Those are some of the feelings expressed in the songs.
Any plans to hit the road?
Yup, we’ve got dates booked in Seattle, including the record release show in July. And we’re working on other shows in the Pacific Northwest for the late summer and fall.
What’s one thing we’d be surprised to hear about the members of _Sundodger______?
If you ask any one member of the band what song they like the most on the record, you’ll get four different answers. When it comes to stuff like that, we’re fiercely different and it made sequencing the songs for the record impossible to do between the four of us. We had to go to our producer Shawn Simmons to have him create the song sequence because we couldn’t agree on anything. Everyone has a lot of experience musically and different points of view, so compromise is sometimes difficult. It nearly broke up the band at one point during the recording process.
Name one present and past artist or group that would be your dream collaboration? Why?
This is a tough question because each member of this band has really different inspirations musically. But for me it would have to The Beatles. Over the past couple years I’ve been reading a lot about how they approached songwriting and recording. Obviously, Lennon and McCartney were revolutionaries in that regard. As a songwriter, I’m really in awe how fearless and experimental they were. In a small way, I’ve tried to adopt the same mindset when in the studio or writing at home. Just try to do something different, whether it is a weird guitar chord or progression. If it doesn’t work, maybe it’ll lead to something else. Or maybe it will take the song to a new level. Presently, J Mascis would be awesome to work with. He’s a genius and somewhat terrifying.
Is there an up and coming band or artist you think we should all be looking out for now?
Thunderpussy is a band that everyone should check out. They’re a fellow Seattle band that just released a new record that is killer. They’re a band that is on the forefront of making guitar rock great again. Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready is a big backer of the band and I ran into Molly and Leah at a place around the corner from our rehearsal space. I was a total fanboy and they were super nice about it.
What else is happening next in your world?
We’re going to try to sell some records and have gotten back to writing songs. We’re taking a different approach to songwriting this time around, it’s much more collaborative and experimental. It’s been fun so far.
http://www.sundodgerband.com/ - Skope Magazine


Dan joins Big D and Roxxy to talk about Sundodger's new EP and a look back at the '90s Seattle music scene. - NWCZRadio.com


Ladies and gentlemen, welcome, welcome, to 75 Bands in 75 Days, where we’re showcasing some of the best talent that the Pacific Northwest has to offer, at least one band per day, leading up to December 31st, to ring in a new year. This list is in no particular order and it is not a chart or a countdown. It’s merely a list of bands or musicians that we feel are worthy of checking out. The band for day 62 is an Everett band called Sundodger.

Helping to bring back grass-roots independent guitar rock in the Pacific Northwest, Sundodger blends straightforward guitar-driven anthems and simple song writing of classic ’70s rock with contemporary musical influences that define the present day.

The new project was formed in 2014 by long-time band mates and Seattle natives Jeff Norman Ryzr and Dan Engel. The music is influenced by the straightedge punk they loved in the ’80s, the classic rock of the ’70s and the indie rock they produced together through the ’90s and 2000s — all blended together to create a sincere, pounding rock show. Newcomer Scott Laird on bass, brings his own influences from his time spent in Athens, Denver and Chicago. Drummer Darrin Wood also recently joined the group and rounds out a driving rhythm section.

Get details about Sundodger’s show at The Benbow Room HERE

Check out Sundodger on Facebook - NW Music Scene


There are hundreds of bands playing in and around the Pacific Northwest. The talent is endless but it is impossible to cover them all. What we here at Seattle Sound Live think is more easily sustainable is telling you about bands that we have taken a liking to. Whether we have seen them live or heard them online, these are bands that have undoubtedly made an impact on us. We have taken them from the vast realms of the inter webs and added them onto our ever growing and beloved playlist. We hope that you too will find a spot for them on your playlists because as far as we are concerned they sure do deserve a spot.

Well wait no more. Here are our latest additions.


Helping to bring back grass-roots independent guitar rock in the Pacific Northwest, Sundodger blends straightforward guitar-driven anthems and simple song writing of classic ’70s rock with contemporary musical influences that define the present day.

Name: Sundodger

Headquarters: Everett, WA

Members: Dan Engel, Jeff Norman Ryzr, Scott Laird, Darrin Wood.

Genre: Rock

Website: http://sundodger.bandcamp.com/releases

What they are: Grass-roots independent guitar rock with contemporary musical influences.

Home
http://sundodger.bandcamp.com/album/home?from=embed - Seattle Sound Live


Words by K
Got in this amazing album from Seattle-based Sundodger and it’s making me feel all the feels, wrapped up in good vibes. If you know me, you know I’ve been going through a rough time recently—things are just now getting better, and I’m kicking myself for not listening to this submission sooner.
I’m just going to go ahead and say it, there is still very much a Seattle sound. Every band I come across from Seattle, regardless of their genre, still has that Seattle grunge aesthetic that the city can’t get away from, and I think that’s a good thing. You really hear its influence in Sundodger’s music. But they still make it their own.
Admittedly, the track “Like Me” is my favorite on the album and I must say, it’s a lot slower than I tend to go for. But maybe when times are tough, slowing it down just a bit can be a good thing.
Whether you’re in the dumps or having a good day, Sundodger’s Bigger Waves has something for everyone. As long as you like your rock with a side of grunge xo. - Left Bank Magazine


The auditory world of Sundodger from Seattle presents an absolutely stunning amalgamation of classic and contemporary rock. Along with thought provoking lyrics reflecting the trials and tribulations of this modern day world, Sundodger is sure to intrigue all who give a listen to their vibrant tapestries. Bigger Waves is the name of their latest magnum opus, featuring dynamic songs such as Banner Days, Keeping A Light On, and Echoes – an actual grand total of ten songs in all, destined to leave quite an impact on those who encounter these exhilarating reprieves. Highwire Daze Online caught up with Sundodger’s lead vocalist / rhythm guitarist Dan Engel to find out a whole lot more about this dynamic new band on the rise. Read on and discover the Banner Days and Bigger Waves of Sundodger…
Introduce yourself, tell me what you do in Sundodger, and how long the band has been together.
Hi, I’m Dan Engel and I’m the lead singer and play rhythm guitar. We’ve been a band for about 4 years.
Where is Sundodger based out of and what is your local music scene like there?
We’re from Seattle. I probably don’t need to tell you about the Seattle music scene. It’s been in the movies and news. All jokes aside, Seattle has changed a lot as a scene and a music community since the ‘90s. There’s been a huge influx of newcomers to town because of a ton of tech hiring over the last 15 years. So, I suppose it’s probably a lot like what San Francisco went through when all the artists and musicians got priced out of town.
Is there any overall story or concept behind the album title Bigger Waves?
This group of songs have common themes running throughout: relationships, isolation and escape. Technology has tried to make everyone more connected but we’re more isolated than ever. It’s all superficial connection. We want human interaction but have forgotten how to relate to one another. There are terrible consequences to that I think. For those of us lucky enough to finally find a meaningful connection with someone, you almost want to just grab that person’s hand a run away to keep it safe. Those are some of the feelings expressed in the songs.
Select two songs from Bigger Waves and what inspired the lyrics.
The obvious one for me is “Keeping a Light On.” It’s a song I wrote very quickly, and the lyrics came immediately afterward. It’s still a song that gets me emotional if I let it. The lyrics are based on a tragic experience when a friend of the band lost his teenage daughter to a heroin overdose. Having a daughter myself, it was really a gut punch for me when I heard about it. It’s written from a parent’s point of view. So, I tried to imagine what I would feel in that situation and just penned the lyrics.
The other one is probably “Echoes.” It was a song that wasn’t really meant to be a Sundodger song but was recorded very late in the process anyway. It’s kind of a spacey, lonely story about someone who has everything they need or desire at the tips of his fingers. The subject of the song is questioning whether all the technology and communication devices around him have truly made him connected or just totally isolated. You can have anything delivered to your doorstep. You can read anything you want. Watch anything you want. But at the end of the day, you’re just sitting there by yourself staring at a computer. Does that make you happy? I don’t know if it does.
Who designed the cover for Bigger Waves and how much input did you have on it?
My old college roommate Jeremy Salyer designed the cover. I had zero input but he is a fantastic graphic designer and is Creative Director at Never Summer Snowboards in Colorado. He created the image originally for our very first show, years and years ago, so I think it was a surprise to him when we adopted it for the cover.
What could one expect from a live Sundodger show?
If you like guitars, drums and rock music, you’ll like our rock show. We don’t do elaborate theatrics or costumes. We’re a bit of a throwback in that way. The people who like our shows, like live music and seeing musicians play instruments.
Has Sundodger ever played in the Los Angeles/Orange County area or plan to do so in the future?
Never. Would love to if someone would have us. I’ve got family and friends in LA and Long Beach. I love it down there, it’s one of my favorite places in the world.
If Sundodger could open for any band either now or from the past, who would it be and why?
If you ask anyone in the band, you’d probably get four different answers. But for me, it would have to be one of those big stadium rock bands from the ‘70s. I wasn’t alive in their heyday, but I’d have loved to have opened for Led Zeppelin for one of those big, crazy stadium crowds. And then burn one down and watch a John Bonham drum solo.
If the music of Sundodger was a donut, what kind would it be and why?
Maple bar. We smell like a donut and taste like a donut, but we’re not going to be round just because every other fucking donut is round.
What’s up next for Sundodger?
We’re going to continue to play shows and hopefully sell some more records. We’re also writing new songs, so maybe down the line sometime soon we’ll go back into the studio.
Any final words of wisdom?
Go down to the record store today and buy a record. It doesn’t have to be ours, but go buy a record, put it on the record player, look at the album cover, hold it in your hands, and listen.
Sundodger is:
Dan Engel (Vocals, guitar)
Jeff Norman (Guitar)
Don Currie (Bass)
Mark Fiebig(Drums)
(Interview by Ken Morton) - Highwire Daze Magazine


Sundodger is an album-oriented rock band. They blend classic guitar rock with elements of punk and new wave to produce a unique sound.
Sundodger is a talented local band that blends straightforward, well-crafted, guitar-driven songs while leaning on a simple but powerful songwriting style. They have a sound that would fit as well in the 1970s as it does today and although they drift on the easier side of the rock genre, at times on the latest release they kick things up a notch and demonstrate their punk and/or hard rock chops. Check out their latest release HERE and we’re fairly confident you’ll become a fan. - Northwest Music Scene


Sundodger, with Bigger Waves, originally released July 3rd but digitally released September 26th, delivers a full-length rock experience akin to a journey on the sea: at times smooth, at times choppy, and all the while echoing the grunge roots of the Seattle music scene. The group composes with repetitive instrumental lines and lyrics, creating an ebbing structure upon which to build dynamics and tension — analogous to the rhythmic nature of ocean waves. Their music incorporates a subtle presence of dissonance that tickles a Foo Fighters funny bone for those craving a sound with a bite.

The album opener, “Too Much Too Soon,” kicks off strong as an upbeat, catchy tune that sets an exciting mood for what’s to follow. The track establishes a fusion classic rock-grunge rock sound between the chorus and verse but excitingly yanks the wheel after the second chorus into a flange-filled, Pink-Floyd-esque breakdown that turned heads on “The Dark Side of the Moon.”
But, Bigger Waves begins to hit, well, bigger waves on its third track, “Like Me,” leaving space for its dissonant lines and chords to ring out and strike the listener. The song starts smoothly with only the lead vocal and rhythm guitar lines swimming alongside one another, creating a distance from the audience through volume. Seamlessly, the bridge introduces drums and a clean, glistening piano line that poignantly interplays with the guitar and vocals. This transition brings the listener to a long-ignored reflection of themself that would only materialize after the onset of a solo voyage.

Deep cut “Last Stand” resembles Hemingway’s old man at sea, creating a feeling of desolation while hinting at ominous desperation. The chorus conveys the hope and vision of a person longing to jump into the unknown. However, with the verse line “I have two best friends / they help me sleep,” a connection of dependence is drawn from the narrator into their background and the demons that keep them up at night. The vibe feels further isolated by the moaning, reverberating vocals and guitar solos throughout the song.
Though repetition is part of Sundodger’s sound, it does carry the risk of being too repetitive, and songs like “Shayla” drag on instead of realizing an engaging simplicity. In “Shayla,” it feels like the vocals are intended to play a dominant role as they are the only section that isn’t continuously present, allowing for greater contrast and interest within the part itself. However, the actualization sounds more like a background component to instrumental elements of higher importance.
After an album’s worth of continually amplifying sound size and complexity, Bigger Waves closes with the eerily gentle “Echoes.” Sundodger dials back here, creating a contrasting presence with respect to the rest of the album through style. A vocal line and acoustic guitar dominate the track, impressively departing from the previous sound into a more singer/songwriter feel. The track is particularly well mixed as the elements of a looming bass drum, soft organ, and whistling effect present throughout the song can go completely unnoticed, yet still vividly color the music.
Bigger Waves is a vessel tossed about the waves and crashed to shore; the listener is cast onto the sandy beach; and “Echoes” is the feeling of the water vacuumously lapping the listener back out to sea with it. - Dan's Tunes


Discography

Bigger Waves, released July 3, 2018

© 2018 Sundodger. All rights reserved.
Produced by Sundodger & Shawn Simmons
All songs by Sundodger
Lyrics by Dan Engel

Engineered by Shawn Simmons
Assistant Engineer Jon Roberts
Recorded and mixed at Studio Litho in Seattle, Washington in 2017-2018
Mastered by Ed Brooks at Resonant Mastering in Seattle, Washington
Vinyl cut by Levi Seitz at Black Belt Mastering in Seattle, Washington
Record pressed at Cascade Record Pressing in Milwaukie, Oregon

Sundodger
Dan Engel – Vocals, rhythm guitar
Jeff Norman – Lead guitar
Don Currie – Bass guitar
Mark Fiebig – Drums, percussion

Don Currie played The Mellotron electro-mechanical keyboard on Echoes
Shawn Simmons played a Vox Jaguar organ on Banner Days
Patrick Porter played piano on Like Me

Cover design by Jeremy Salyer
Layout by Dan Engel


Keeping a Light On/Too Much Too Soonreleased January 2016

Sundodger is: Dan Engel (Vocals, Guitar), Jeff Norman (Guitar), Don Currie (Bass), Mark Fiebig (Drums)

All songs by Sundodger. 

All lyrics by Dan Engel. 

Recorded at ButterSound Recordings in Everett, Wash., November 2015. 

Special thanks to Chip Butters who engineered, mixed and mastered the project. 

Cover art by Jeremy Salyer. 

© 2016 Sundodger 

Home, released August 2014.

Sundodger is:
Dan Engel – Vocals, Guitar, 
Jeff Norman – Guitar
Special Guest – Patrick Porter, Bass Guitar

All songs by Dan Engel and Jeff Norman.
All lyrics by Dan Engel.

Recorded at ButterSound Recordings in Everett, Wash., Spring of 2014.
Special thanks to Chip Butters who engineered, mixed, mastered and help guide the project.

Cover design by Jeremy Salyer.

© 2014 Sundodger

Photos

Bio

AIMING TO PUT THE DANGER BACK IN ROCK N’ ROLL SEATTLE’S SUNDODGER AMPS UP FOR SOME ‘BIGGER WAVES’ ON THEIR HIGH-POWERED FULL LENGTH DEBUT

Dan Engel, multi-talented frontman and guitarist for emerging Seattle powerhouse band Sundodger, says the easiest thing for him, band co-founder Jeff Norman (guitar) and their groove intensive rhythm section (bassist Don Currie, drummer Mark Fiebig) to do would be to write music that fits in nicely into the mainstream rock we’re hearing today. “But nobody would stomach that,” Engel adds. “Music today is very safe, no pointy edges, and would go very nicely on a mobile phone or Corona commercial. We would love to see a little danger put back into rock n roll.”

Taking raucous and lyrically provocative action in that direction, Sundodger creates intense AOR rock for our era, fusing classic guitar rock edged with punk and new wave on their full length debut Bigger Waves. Released both on vinyl (the ultimate reflection of its classic rock roots) and digitally, the compelling 10 track collection was recorded at Studio Litho with the help of producer/engineer Shawn Simmons, who has been behind the boards for Northwest heavyweights like Head and the Heart, My Goodness and Lemelo. The tracks were mastered in Seattle by Ed Brooks (Resonant Mastering); lacquer was cut by Levi Seitz (Black Belt Mastering).

Though Bigger Waves is the band’s full length debut with Sundodger’s current lineup, it is technically a follow-up to the band’s 2014 EP Home, which featured Engel on drums and rhythm guitar, Norman on lead guitar and a guest overdubbing the bass parts. As such, Bigger Waves reflects their exciting evolution and the natural chemistry that happens when a developing band hits its stride with the right lineup. Currie and Fiebig, who joined in 2016, have known each other since high school and were previously in a Seattle group called Betty Ford Falcons.

“We really took our time with Bigger Waves, a year and a half from end to end,” he adds. “We are a much closer band after going through that process. We had all the blowout fights and stuff like that and got through it – all of which has made us better musicians and people. Sonically, we did a lot of experimenting with guitar tones, vocals and for the first time brought keyboards into the mix. The result is a cohesive collection of song that will take listeners on a journey, rather than just a list of disparate tracks.”

That fascinating trip deals in depth with relationships and working through the difficulties that are always part of them – with offbeat, sometimes non-linear, Cobain-esque lyrics that can be unlocked from different angles. “Banner Days” is a high energy, autobiographical reflection on the ups and downs Engel and his wife have gone through over the years, financially and emotionally, and how that’s made them stronger. “Like Me”, whose cool dynamic includes hypnotic keyboard elements, is Engel’s favorite tune, a tale of two flawed individuals who break out of their individual isolations when they find each other. “Echoes” and “Epitaph” coincidentally dovetail thematically into each other. Both invoke the dual realities of reliance and isolation in our device dependent world. “Echoes” tackles the irony of being able to do so much but not really accomplishing anything with those capabilities, while “Epitaph” is a more hard-hitting, destructive result of making online connections that seem more real than they actually are.

The roots of Sundodger extend back to the 90s, when Engel and Norman formed the band Divided Sky after they met in college. With Engel on drums, the band released two CDs and toured around the Pacific Northwest. Years after a mutual burnout found the two pursuing music related career endeavors apart from the band grind, they reunited as Divided Sky for a few shows and rekindled the old creative spark and decided to write new material (with Engel on vocals and guitar) - which led to the formation of Sundodger.

“I think the style of music we play comes from us just having been musicians for a long time and understanding the only thing that will really resonant with a listener is if the art you create is honest,” Engel says. “And we all listen to different genres and are influenced as such. The common string throughout the bands we love is that those bands did what they wanted with their art. Especially punk rock. That DIY and F you I'm going to do what I want has always been thrilling for me.”


Band Members