Gary Douglas Band
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Gary Douglas Band

New York City, NY | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

New York City, NY | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Americana Rock

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Apr
20
Gary Douglas Band @ The Space at Westbury

Westbury, NY

Westbury, NY

Apr
18
Gary Douglas Band @ Bull Run Restaurant

Shirley, MA

Shirley, MA

Apr
16
Gary Douglas Band @ City Winery

Boston, MA

Boston, MA

Apr
15
Gary Douglas Band @ City Winery

New York, NY

New York, NY

Apr
14
Gary Douglas Band @ City Winery DC

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Apr
13
Gary Douglas Band @ Rams Head On Stage

Annapolis, MD

Annapolis, MD

Apr
12
Gary Douglas Band @ sellersville theater

Sellersville, PA

Sellersville, PA

Mar
09
Gary Douglas Band @ Town Hall Theater

Middlebury, VT

Middlebury, VT

Mar
08
Gary Douglas Band @ Center for the Arts of Homer

Homer, NY

Homer, NY

Feb
02
Gary Douglas Band @ Jefferson Theater

Charlottesville, VA

Charlottesville, VA

Feb
01
Gary Douglas Band @ Neighborhood Theatre

Charlotte, NC

Charlotte, NC

Jan
24
Gary Douglas Band @ Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center

Old Saybrook, CT

Old Saybrook, CT

Jan
23
Gary Douglas Band @ City Winery

New York, NY

New York, NY

Dec
07
Gary Douglas Band @ The Westcott Theater

Syracuse, NY

Syracuse, NY

Nov
30
Gary Douglas Band @ The Cave

Big Bear Lake, CA

Big Bear Lake, CA

Nov
29
Gary Douglas Band @ Fremont Theater

CA

CA

Oct
26
Gary Douglas Band @ Vinyl Music Hall

Pensacola, FL

Pensacola, FL

Oct
10
Gary Douglas Band @ Rockwood Music Hall

New York, NY

New York, NY

Jun
22
Gary Douglas Band @ Neighborhood Theatre

Charlotte, NC

Charlotte, NC

Jun
13
Gary Douglas Band @ The McKittrick Hotel

New York, NY

New York, NY

Jul
20
Gary Douglas Band @ The Stephen Talkhouse

Amagansett, NY

Amagansett, NY

Apr
09
Gary Douglas Band @ Yoshi's Oakland

Oakland, CA

Oakland, CA

Apr
08
Gary Douglas Band @ Whiskey A Go Go

West Hollywood, CA

West Hollywood, CA

Apr
07
Gary Douglas Band @ The Coach House

San Juan Capistrano, CA

San Juan Capistrano, CA

Mar
04
Gary Douglas Band @ Buckhead Theatre

Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, GA

Music

Press


Gary Douglas
Keepin' Faith
(Self released)

If you haven't heard of Douglas yet, knowing that his band opened for the likes of Yngwie Malmsteen, Bumblefoot and Gary Hoey on the Guitar Gods tour should be enough to get your attention; Douglas will certainly have you rapt when Keepin' Faith starts spinning. Douglas has a "from the heartland" kind of voice and songwriting style and the obvious comparison here is to John Mellencamp, with cuts like "Faith (Renewed)" sounding especially Mellencamp-ish, and others like "Out on the Highway" demonstrating a real talent for wrapping catchy vocals around hooky guitar riffs. - Antimusic.com


Powerhouse rootsy rock band THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND is having a good time sharing new music from their latest full-length album, KEEPIN’ FAITH out now, with live audiences. The eclectic eight-piece ensemble–fronted by New York City-based vocalist, songwriter and guitar player GARY DOUGLAS–has just announced a series of new tour dates, including a rescheduled show at The Bowery Electric in New York City on Saturday, April 30 (the previously scheduled date was postponed due to Snowstorm Jonas).

Read the Q&A below as GARY talks about the new album, the inspiration for the sounds and how his life’s journey has brought him to where he is today.

KEEPIN’ FAITH–a diverse mix of classic rock, Americana, country and blues–was released October 9 on iTunes.

Every shred of feeling throughout KEEPIN’ FAITH comes straight from the liberated heart of GARY DOUGLAS,the urgency of “My Desire,” the restless summons to seek a better life “Out on the Highway,” the explosive anger of “Lord I Try,” the screaming release of “Stop Bringing Me Down,” and the broken romance of “Goodbye Marie.” Acclaimed album producer Anthony Resta (Elton John, Needtobreathe, Collective Soul, Guster, Perry Farrell, Nuno Bettencourt, Shawn Mullins, Sara Evans) was brought in to help tie the project together.

RAISE THE QUESTION: GARY DOUGLAS BAND

Your latest album is titled Keepin’ Faith. Let’s dive into the 12 tracks on this record, starting with the U2-meets-Bob Seger pedal-to-the-metal album opener “My Desire.” Is this a cautionary tale warning people that you can’t always get what you want?

I don’t know if it’s cautionary; it’s all stream of consciousness. If I had to go back and rewrite it I’d fine-tune and focus a little bit more, but it’s about somebody’s quest in life and frustrations going down the road of life, and not always getting what you want – that is true. But it’s also a little bit of hope where he’s got this strong desire and passion about things. It could be desire for things in life, but he also sees a candle in this woman’s window and he thinks maybe they can get it right together. So it’s like, can she also feel that desire? It’s trying to find someone to share the frustration of life with.

Speaking of sharing, can you share where the seed for the song came from?

I was watching Jason Bonham [on TV] on some live rock and roll fest and I was really digging it, and so I was just in that mood to write a riff rock thing. That just popped out of my head and the rest I think I wrote in three minutes, start to finish. You know, sometimes they come easy and its stream of consciousness, and sometimes, you must intend to write a song about something and then when you finally sit down with a pen and paper it just pops into your head. “My Desire” was definitely the latter.

Sonically, track 2, “To Be With You,” sits in the Bruce Springsteen school of gritty guitars, pulsating piano, and lyrically it leans on themes of mending broken hearts. Is this all fair to say?

That one is a deeply regretful song. It’s about regretting a relationship that did not work out. It’s about the heartbreak of love, but it’s in a major key so it was like a real feeling of, it’s good to have at least lived and loved, or something like that. But it’s definitely a regret song of, you know, I wish I would have done it differently, type of thing. Some of the lyrics are about, if I could do it again or turn back. We ended up with two broken hearts and I’d do it all over again.

What I took away from track 3, “Faith (Renewed),” is that the character is a non-believer trying to find faith from a source other than God. Am I on the right track there?

Pretty much right on the button… In fact, when I introduce that song when we play it live I talk about faith as a powerful thing; faith itself, and not necessarily in God or a higher power. Faith itself can be powerful. Faith in people, yourself, in belief, in whatever it is: in overcoming adversity. You don’t have the answer in front of you, and just persevering in the face of not having the answer in front of you is what faith is in my mind.

It seems the search – this time for simple peace of mind – continues on “Out On the Highway.” Talk a little bit about this song.

That song was inspired by a combination of two things. One was we were on a tour a year ago, summer 2014, of 20 some odd cities and it was a long haul, and we were out on the highway, so that was probably somewhere floating in my mind. But I was also struck by some folks that I know from West Virginia and that area who had had some tough times, you know, struggling to get ahead in life and s**t happens to them. And so I felt that kind of pain, of their pain, and just like, there’s gotta be a f***in’ better way than making a living like this. And so I’m just leaving. I’m leaving and I’m gonna find it, and that’s the search. There’s gotta be something better than this, something better than getting blown-up in a coal mine or having some dead-end job.

In the circa late 60s sounding “Stop Bringing Me Down” you appear to be trying to shed yourself of folks spreading negativity. Are you generally an optimist?

I don’t know. I’m definitely not a negative person; I’m always pretty upbeat – but realistic. I’ve had my share of people who, in many different aspects of life, who either just want to burst your bubble, or outright undermine you. So that’s my f**k you to them. And I was just in a kind of 60s psychedelic mood when I wrote it.

Another album highlight for me is the slinky blues rocker “Lord I Try” which reminds me of John Lennon’s “Well Well Well.” In general, how autobiographical is this album?

This album is all about the feeling that I experience in life (laughs). So it’s totally from me. I’d say there are characters, you know, and sometimes I just write outright, and a couple that are on there I’m just having fun. But usually it’s inspired by some kind of feeling that I’m trying to grapple with. And [as for] the John Lennon “Well Well Well,” you’re one of the few people that have picked up on that. If you hear it, like when I originally demoed it on my iPad, I was going for that barebones type of thing. I’m just pointing out that it’s interesting because if you heard the original demo that I made of it, it was clearly like John Lennon’s “Well Well Well.”

I mentioned that the tone of “Lord I Try” is a little slinky; I describe “Midnight Angel” as a little spooky, reminiscent of Bruce’s “Point Blank.” Who or what inspired this tune?

That’s another stream of consciousness type of thing that just poured out, literally, in just a few minutes, and I guess it’s about this person in this guy’s life, and together they’re in a relationship, she’s his midnight angel, maybe even a bit fantasy, and the relationship depends a little bit on the white lies that she tells and all this kind of stuff, but it works for them. Until one day it’s just gonna blow-up and inevitably end.

Let’s hit pause for a minute on going through the record and get a bit of background bio info on you. Going back further in time, what artists were you most drawn to when you were growing up in Brooklyn and Long Island?

Oh, obviously I would say all the classics. Anything from Elvis Presley to The Beatles to the Stones to Jimi Hendrix to Dylan to Springsteen to Nirvana and Guns N’ Roses to Black Sabbath, uh I could keep on going. You probably got the picture. David Bowie. I was definitely into the whole punk rock scene there for a while, from The Ramones to the New York Dolls, Blondie; stop me now!

When did you first decide to make your own music?

I started writing stuff the first time I took a music lesson because I found it pretty boring and tedious. My parents would yell at me for not practicing, cuz I would get sidetracked with just trying to do my own thing and make my own music.

What age were you when you first started?

I had to be about nine or 10. And then really writing songs started happening in my teens…I had my high school band and all that stuff.

I’d like to briefly visit your days as a lawyer. Are there any similarities between writing a closing argument and writing a song?

Exactly the same thing!

In what way?

Well for me, the way I went about it, I could never do a case unless it was something that had some kind of compelling human interest; something that’s important to more than just the people involved in the lawsuit or the case, or whatever. Music is about communicating a message on some visceral level, a feeling and connecting. Communicating and connecting. Doing a summation for a jury is about the same thing; communicating and connecting about some important message. I’ve had jurors crying and laughing, and that’s what you wanna do when you’re singing and playing music. You want people to have an emotional reaction. And it doesn’t happen every time you play a song or do a performance, and it doesn’t happen every time you do a summation. For me, the feeling, especially a live performance, is exactly the same, when I’m locked in and the audience is right there with us.

Speaking of the law, explain the significance of the title for “On Bradford Hill.”

So Bradford Hill is just sort of a tongue-in-cheek thing. In science there’s a guy called Bradford Hill, Professor Bradford Hill, and he has come up with these criteria to determine proof of something that causes something else. The idiots that are in the legal profession take this and apply it to law so that if it doesn’t meet the Bradford Hill criteria it’s not admissible if it’s something in science you’re trying to prove. And they always misinterpret it. Lawyers trying to figure out science is always a catastrophe. Anyways, so I just took the concept tongue-in-cheek, Bradford Hill, it’s a hill, it’s a place, where people go to find meaning in life. It’s a tongue-in-cheek play on words that most people don’t know unless they’ve ever heard of [Professor] Bradford Hill (laughs).

I’m curious about why you decided to seriously downshift the tempo for “On Bradford Hill” at around 3:50 in?

Anthony Resta, who’s the producer, he loved this song and the idea of it because he saw it as the search for proof of life out there in the universe and proof of a higher power. He’s always fascinated by science fiction and space travel. So he encouraged me with this idea, like, why don’t we just go for this different kind of thing, in a whole different direction, like pondering the universe. But Scott Chasolen deserves all the credit for this.

So how does a boy from Brooklyn pen a great country rock number like “Over You?” To me it’s got the swagger of The Rolling Stones’ “Dead Flowers.”

Yeah, I guess that’s how it happened. I have all this stuff embedded in my DNA, so I think “Over You” was sort of like a “Dead Flowers” influenced type of thing. But I can write country songs all day long; I got a million of ’em.

You mentioned the producer, Anthony Resta, a couple of times. I understand you had a very hand-in-glove working relationship with him. What was the most important ingredient he added to the process of recording this record?

Giving it more depth, texture, focus and polish.

If you were to record a duet with an artist outside of the genre of music for which you are known, who might that be and what song would you cover?

That would definitely be Frank Sinatra, and there’s a million songs of his, but just to take one I would say “That’s Life.” He’s one of those guys whose fame overshadowed their actual talent. He really was tremendously gifted and was a passionate artist, despite his own personal issues and reputation. Sinatra’s overall fame often diminished the simple fact that he was a passionate artist that was personable enough to touch people’s heart.

Okay, we’ve presented the evidence, now give me your best closing argument for why people should run out and buy your album Keepin’ Faith.

Well I would just say that these are songs about everyday life; the simple struggles of everyday life, the ups and the downs and the feelings that we have on a daily basis. I’m not trying to say anything profound or solve world peace. But if getting through the day and getting through life and trying to make sense of all of that stuff and the struggle of it is your thing, you might relate to the songs on this record. And if your thing is Americana and rhythm and blues inspired rock n’ roll, then this is an album that you should take a listen to. - Vents Magazine


Powerhouse rootsy rock band THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND is having a good time sharing new music from their latest full-length album, KEEPIN’ FAITH out now, with live audiences. The eclectic eight-piece ensemble–fronted by New York City-based vocalist, songwriter and guitar player GARY DOUGLAS–has just announced a series of new tour dates, including a rescheduled show at The Bowery Electric in New York City on Saturday, April 30 (the previously scheduled date was postponed due to Snowstorm Jonas).

Read the Q&A below as GARY talks about the new album, the inspiration for the sounds and how his life’s journey has brought him to where he is today.

KEEPIN’ FAITH–a diverse mix of classic rock, Americana, country and blues–was released October 9 on iTunes. A recent album review by Relix dubbed DOUGLAS a “rock-and-roll troubadour, an intrepid journeyman whose sweat-drenched sound reminds one of the usual heartland heroes, Fogerty, Mellencamp and Seger chief among them…with his blue-collar ethic, and staunch determination, all faith is warranted.” (2/3/16).

Elsewhere, Rachael Ciccone of The Aquarian noted “The combination of classic rock and country blues is assembled in the best way throughout NY-based band, The Gary Douglas Band‘s music” (1/5/16), while Elmore Magazine wrote “Gary Douglas may have strayed a bit off the musician’s path for a while, picking up a law degree along the way, but he is a rock n roller through and through- and don’t you forget it…this gives the song [“Out On The Highway”] a raw edge, filled to bursting with powerhouse vocals, from both Douglas and his backup singers. Interchanging solos on guitar and keys add a dash of spontaneity, well received by the swaying, cheering crowd. For being relatively new to the game, Douglas seems perfectly at ease and in command front and center.” (1/11/16)

Every shred of feeling throughout KEEPIN’ FAITH comes straight from the liberated heart of GARY DOUGLAS,the urgency of “My Desire,” the restless summons to seek a better life “Out on the Highway,” the explosive anger of “Lord I Try,” the screaming release of “Stop Bringing Me Down,” and the broken romance of “Goodbye Marie.” Acclaimed album producer Anthony Resta (Elton John, Needtobreathe, Collective Soul, Guster, Perry Farrell, Nuno Bettencourt, Shawn Mullins, Sara Evans) was brought in to help tie the project together.

RAISE THE QUESTION: GARY DOUGLAS BAND

Your latest album is titled Keepin’ Faith. Let’s dive into the 12 tracks on this record, starting with the U2-meets-Bob Seger pedal-to-the-metal album opener “My Desire.” Is this a cautionary tale warning people that you can’t always get what you want?

I don’t know if it’s cautionary; it’s all stream of consciousness. If I had to go back and rewrite it I’d fine-tune and focus a little bit more, but it’s about somebody’s quest in life and frustrations going down the road of life, and not always getting what you want – that is true. But it’s also a little bit of hope where he’s got this strong desire and passion about things. It could be desire for things in life, but he also sees a candle in this woman’s window and he thinks maybe they can get it right together. So it’s like, can she also feel that desire? It’s trying to find someone to share the frustration of life with.

Speaking of sharing, can you share where the seed for the song came from?

I was watching Jason Bonham [on TV] on some live rock and roll fest and I was really digging it, and so I was just in that mood to write a riff rock thing. That just popped out of my head and the rest I think I wrote in three minutes, start to finish. You know, sometimes they come easy and its stream of consciousness, and sometimes, you must intend to write a song about something and then when you finally sit down with a pen and paper it just pops into your head. “My Desire” was definitely the latter.

Sonically, track 2, “To Be With You,” sits in the Bruce Springsteen school of gritty guitars, pulsating piano, and lyrically it leans on themes of mending broken hearts. Is this all fair to say?

That one is a deeply regretful song. It’s about regretting a relationship that did not work out. It’s about the heartbreak of love, but it’s in a major key so it was like a real feeling of, it’s good to have at least lived and loved, or something like that. But it’s definitely a regret song of, you know, I wish I would have done it differently, type of thing. Some of the lyrics are about, if I could do it again or turn back. We ended up with two broken hearts and I’d do it all over again.

What I took away from track 3, “Faith (Renewed),” is that the character is a non-believer trying to find faith from a source other than God. Am I on the right track there?

Pretty much right on the button… In fact, when I introduce that song when we play it live I talk about faith as a powerful thing; faith itself, and not necessarily in God or a higher power. Faith itself can be powerful. Faith in people, yourself, in belief, in whatever it is: in overcoming adversity. You don’t have the answer in front of you, and just persevering in the face of not having the answer in front of you is what faith is in my mind.

It seems the search – this time for simple peace of mind – continues on “Out On the Highway.” Talk a little bit about this song.

That song was inspired by a combination of two things. One was we were on a tour a year ago, summer 2014, of 20 some odd cities and it was a long haul, and we were out on the highway, so that was probably somewhere floating in my mind. But I was also struck by some folks that I know from West Virginia and that area who had had some tough times, you know, struggling to get ahead in life and s**t happens to them. And so I felt that kind of pain, of their pain, and just like, there’s gotta be a f***in’ better way than making a living like this. And so I’m just leaving. I’m leaving and I’m gonna find it, and that’s the search. There’s gotta be something better than this, something better than getting blown-up in a coal mine or having some dead-end job.

In the circa late 60s sounding “Stop Bringing Me Down” you appear to be trying to shed yourself of folks spreading negativity. Are you generally an optimist?

I don’t know. I’m definitely not a negative person; I’m always pretty upbeat – but realistic. I’ve had my share of people who, in many different aspects of life, who either just want to burst your bubble, or outright undermine you. So that’s my f**k you to them. And I was just in a kind of 60s psychedelic mood when I wrote it.

Another album highlight for me is the slinky blues rocker “Lord I Try” which reminds me of John Lennon’s “Well Well Well.” In general, how autobiographical is this album?

This album is all about the feeling that I experience in life (laughs). So it’s totally from me. I’d say there are characters, you know, and sometimes I just write outright, and a couple that are on there I’m just having fun. But usually it’s inspired by some kind of feeling that I’m trying to grapple with. And [as for] the John Lennon “Well Well Well,” you’re one of the few people that have picked up on that. If you hear it, like when I originally demoed it on my iPad, I was going for that barebones type of thing. I’m just pointing out that it’s interesting because if you heard the original demo that I made of it, it was clearly like John Lennon’s “Well Well Well.”

I mentioned that the tone of “Lord I Try” is a little slinky; I describe “Midnight Angel” as a little spooky, reminiscent of Bruce’s “Point Blank.” Who or what inspired this tune?

That’s another stream of consciousness type of thing that just poured out, literally, in just a few minutes, and I guess it’s about this person in this guy’s life, and together they’re in a relationship, she’s his midnight angel, maybe even a bit fantasy, and the relationship depends a little bit on the white lies that she tells and all this kind of stuff, but it works for them. Until one day it’s just gonna blow-up and inevitably end.

Let’s hit pause for a minute on going through the record and get a bit of background bio info on you. Going back further in time, what artists were you most drawn to when you were growing up in Brooklyn and Long Island?

Oh, obviously I would say all the classics. Anything from Elvis Presley to The Beatles to the Stones to Jimi Hendrix to Dylan to Springsteen to Nirvana and Guns N’ Roses to Black Sabbath, uh I could keep on going. You probably got the picture. David Bowie. I was definitely into the whole punk rock scene there for a while, from The Ramones to the New York Dolls, Blondie; stop me now!

When did you first decide to make your own music?

I started writing stuff the first time I took a music lesson because I found it pretty boring and tedious. My parents would yell at me for not practicing, cuz I would get sidetracked with just trying to do my own thing and make my own music.

What age were you when you first started?

I had to be about nine or 10. And then really writing songs started happening in my teens…I had my high school band and all that stuff.

I’d like to briefly visit your days as a lawyer. Are there any similarities between writing a closing argument and writing a song?

Exactly the same thing!

In what way?

Well for me, the way I went about it, I could never do a case unless it was something that had some kind of compelling human interest; something that’s important to more than just the people involved in the lawsuit or the case, or whatever. Music is about communicating a message on some visceral level, a feeling and connecting. Communicating and connecting. Doing a summation for a jury is about the same thing; communicating and connecting about some important message. I’ve had jurors crying and laughing, and that’s what you wanna do when you’re singing and playing music. You want people to have an emotional reaction. And it doesn’t happen every time you play a song or do a performance, and it doesn’t happen every time you do a summation. For me, the feeling, especially a live performance, is exactly the same, when I’m locked in and the audience is right there with us.

Speaking of the law, explain the significance of the title for “On Bradford Hill.”

So Bradford Hill is just sort of a tongue-in-cheek thing. In science there’s a guy called Bradford Hill, Professor Bradford Hill, and he has come up with these criteria to determine proof of something that causes something else. The idiots that are in the legal profession take this and apply it to law so that if it doesn’t meet the Bradford Hill criteria it’s not admissible if it’s something in science you’re trying to prove. And they always misinterpret it. Lawyers trying to figure out science is always a catastrophe. Anyways, so I just took the concept tongue-in-cheek, Bradford Hill, it’s a hill, it’s a place, where people go to find meaning in life. It’s a tongue-in-cheek play on words that most people don’t know unless they’ve ever heard of [Professor] Bradford Hill (laughs).

I’m curious about why you decided to seriously downshift the tempo for “On Bradford Hill” at around 3:50 in?

Anthony Resta, who’s the producer, he loved this song and the idea of it because he saw it as the search for proof of life out there in the universe and proof of a higher power. He’s always fascinated by science fiction and space travel. So he encouraged me with this idea, like, why don’t we just go for this different kind of thing, in a whole different direction, like pondering the universe. But Scott Chasolen deserves all the credit for this.

So how does a boy from Brooklyn pen a great country rock number like “Over You?” To me it’s got the swagger of The Rolling Stones’ “Dead Flowers.”

Yeah, I guess that’s how it happened. I have all this stuff embedded in my DNA, so I think “Over You” was sort of like a “Dead Flowers” influenced type of thing. But I can write country songs all day long; I got a million of ’em.

You mentioned the producer, Anthony Resta, a couple of times. I understand you had a very hand-in-glove working relationship with him. What was the most important ingredient he added to the process of recording this record?

Giving it more depth, texture, focus and polish.

If you were to record a duet with an artist outside of the genre of music for which you are known, who might that be and what song would you cover?

That would definitely be Frank Sinatra, and there’s a million songs of his, but just to take one I would say “That’s Life.” He’s one of those guys whose fame overshadowed their actual talent. He really was tremendously gifted and was a passionate artist, despite his own personal issues and reputation. Sinatra’s overall fame often diminished the simple fact that he was a passionate artist that was personable enough to touch people’s heart.

Okay, we’ve presented the evidence, now give me your best closing argument for why people should run out and buy your album Keepin’ Faith.

Well I would just say that these are songs about everyday life; the simple struggles of everyday life, the ups and the downs and the feelings that we have on a daily basis. I’m not trying to say anything profound or solve world peace. But if getting through the day and getting through life and trying to make sense of all of that stuff and the struggle of it is your thing, you might relate to the songs on this record. And if your thing is Americana and rhythm and blues inspired rock n’ roll, then this is an album that you should take a listen to. - Don411.Com


​​Powerhouse rootsy rock band THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND is having a good time sharing new music from their latest full-length album, KEEPIN' FAITH out now, with live audiences. The eclectic eight-piece ensemble--fronted by New York City-based vocalist, songwriter and guitar player GARY DOUGLAS--has just announced a series of new tour dates, including a rescheduled show at The Bowery Electric in New York City on Saturday, April 30 (the previously scheduled date was postponed due to Snowstorm Jonas).

KEEPIN' FAITH--a diverse mix of classic rock, Americana, country and blues--was released October 9 on iTunes. A recent album review by Relix dubbed DOUGLAS a "rock-and-roll troubadour, an intrepid journeyman whose sweat-drenched sound reminds one of the usual heartland heroes, Fogerty, Mellencamp and Seger chief among them...with his blue-collar ethic, and staunch determination, all faith is warranted." (2/3/16).

Elsewhere, Rachael Ciccone of The Aquarian noted "The combination of classic rock and country blues is assembled in the best way throughout NY-based band, The Gary Douglas Band's music" (1/5/16), while Elmore Magazine wrote "Gary Douglas may have strayed a bit off the musician's path for a while, picking up a law degree along the way, but he is a rock n roller through and through- and don't you forget it...this gives the song ["Out On The Highway"] a raw edge, filled to bursting with powerhouse vocals, from both Douglas and his backup singers. Interchanging solos on guitar and keys add a dash of spontaneity, well received by the swaying, cheering crowd. For being relatively new to the game, Douglas seems perfectly at ease and in command front and center." (1/11/16)

Every shred of feeling throughout KEEPIN' FAITH comes straight from the liberated heart of GARY DOUGLAS,the urgency of "My Desire," the restless summons to seek a better life "Out on the Highway," the explosive anger of "Lord I Try," the screaming release of "Stop Bringing Me Down," and the broken romance of"Goodbye Marie." Acclaimed album producer Anthony Resta (Elton John, Needtobreathe, Collective Soul, Guster, Perry Farrell, Nuno Bettencourt, Shawn Mullins, Sara Evans) was brought in to help tie the project together.

Catch THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND out on the road this year:

THU, 3/10, New York, NY
The Shop

WED, 4/13, New York, NY
Red Lion

SAT, 4/30, New York, NY
The Bowery Electric

THU, 5/19, Montauk, NY
Montauk Music Festival 2016

FRI, 5/20, Montauk, NY
Montauk Music Festival 2016

SAT, 5/21, Montauk, NY
Montauk Music Festival 2016

SAT, 6/3, Piermont, NY
The Turning Point

SUN, 6/26, Tappan, NY
Rockland-Bergen Music Festival

THU, 7/21, Amagansett, NY
The Stephen Talkhouse - Broadway World (Dot) Com


A heady mix of classic rock, Americana, country and blues, The Gary Douglas Band have been enjoying quite a bit of success with their second album. Their frontman spoke to Digital Journal.

Like so many before him, Gary Douglas began playing in bands while still at college. The need to earn a living subsequently saw him walk away from performing for a number of years, though he spent that time wisely, working as a lawyer in his native New York.

The burning desire to make music never went away, however, and after putting together a rocking new band, consisting of Jeremy Goldsmith on guitar, keyboardist Scott Chasolen, Dan Asher on bass, drummer Stefano Baldasseroni, horn player Nick Biello and backing vocalists Yula Beeri and Clara Lofaro, he released the second album to bear his name, Keepin' Faith, in October last year.

"We've done a few shows," says the man himself over the telephone from New York, discussing what he and his cohorts have been up to of late, "and we're actually also doing some pre-production in anticipation of another record with Anthony Resta, who produced our last album."

The bandleader, who writes the music and the lyrics by himself before the other members add their valuable input, hopes to have the new CD out by the "end of spring, early summer."

Keepin' Faith incorporates quite a few different genres and I wondered whether its follow-up will carry on in a similar vein. "Probably," muses Gary, "though maybe it'll have a stronger edge. It might focus more on Americana, at least that's the way it's coming together right now."

In its first two weeks of release, the first single, "To Be With You," was added to over 20 American radio stations. The second, "Faith (Renewed)" has also proved popular. Does Gary think this might be partly due to the fact that people are getting tired of the manufactured pop coming out of Nashville, for example?

"I guess... I know I am," he replies. "I mean there's obviously folks that that manufactured type of formula is not gonna resonate with, so I guess as a natural consequence of that there are people that this kind of thing would resonate with...

"I think there's too much of the contrived stuff out there and what we're really dedicated to - what we really believe in - is the roots of rock 'n' roll. Americana isn't just a genre; it's an art form that's timeless and we're trying to stay true to it and keep it alive, so to speak. When we play our live shows we find that's where it resonates most."

Other tunes of note among the 12 on offer include "Out on the Highway," "My Desire," "Lord I Try" and "Cold Blood" and I wanted to know which had been earmarked for possible singles in the future.

"Well we are actually discussing that right now... There's one song on the album that people seem to react to that's definitely outside of the concept, so you wouldn't think we'd release it as a single.

"It's called 'Goodbye Marie' and it's this lonely message, a guy singing almost into space. There's very little musical accompaniment at the beginning, yet it ends with big-time production - 25 tracks of vocals."

"To play as many live shows as is humanly possible!" says the musician, when asked about his other plans for 2016. "That's where we really enjoy ourselves - it's what we really love to do...

"We are looking at a brief tour in South America at the end of March, early April, opening for The Titans of Rock, which is Gene Simmons and some other known and respected artists like Richie Sambora. We're trying to make that deal happen right now."

Revealing why he took such a long break from music, Gary confesses, "I got disenchanted with the music business and life took me in a different direction... But I always felt it was something I would have to circle back to, ultimately. If I only knew then what I know now!" - DIGITALJOURNAL.COM


Jan 12, 2016
Raised in Brooklyn and Long Island, Gary Douglas’ musical foundation was built on the solid rock of all-time classic acts that included Elvis Presley, The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and Bob Dylan. Later, he built upon that base by adding additional influences that included the genius of David Bowie, the grit of Bruce Springsteen, the heaviness of Black Sabbath and the angst of Big Apple punk heroes The Ramones and New York Dolls. Music was his life, but would it be his livelihood? Not yet.

The jury was still out on how Douglas would pay his bills until he decided to temporarily ditch his dreams of making money performing for crowds in favor of arguing the law in front of a judge and jury as a lawyer. Thankfully, Douglas eventually changed course, turning in his briefcase in exchange for a guitar case and is back pursuing his lifelong passion of playing rock and roll. Today, Douglas is making his case for songs over summations with the release of his current album, Keepin’ Faith. The evidence that Douglas’ decision to get back to making music was, well, sound, lies in the 12 songs that make up this fine collection which finds him and his bandmates guilty of one thing: making quite a rockin’ ruckus.

Your latest album is titled Keepin’ Faith. Let’s dive into the 12 tracks on this record, starting with the U2-meets-Bob Seger pedal-to-the-metal album opener “My Desire.” Is this a cautionary tale warning people that you can’t always get what you want?

I don’t know if it’s cautionary; it’s all stream of consciousness. If I had to go back and rewrite it I’d fine-tune and focus a little bit more, but it’s about somebody’s quest in life and frustrations going down the road of life, and not always getting what you want – that is true. But it’s also a little bit of hope where he’s got this strong desire and passion about things. It could be desire for things in life, but he also sees a candle in this woman’s window and he thinks maybe they can get it right together. So it’s like, can she also feel that desire? It’s trying to find someone to share the frustration of life with.

Speaking of sharing, can you share where the seed for the song came from?
I was watching Jason Bonham [on TV] on some live rock and roll fest and I was really digging it, and so I was just in that mood to write a riff rock thing. That just popped out of my head and the rest I think I wrote in three minutes, start to finish. You know, sometimes they come easy and its stream of consciousness, and sometimes, you must intend to write a song about something and then when you finally sit down with a pen and paper it just pops into your head. “My Desire” was definitely the latter.

Sonically, track 2, “To Be With You,” sits in the Bruce Springsteen school of gritty guitars, pulsating piano, and lyrically it leans on themes of mending broken hearts. Is this all fair to say?

That one is a deeply regretful song. It’s about regretting a relationship that did not work out. It’s about the heartbreak of love, but it’s in a major key so it was like a real feeling of, it’s good to have at least lived and loved, or something like that. But it’s definitely a regret song of, you know, I wish I would have done it differently, type of thing. Some of the lyrics are about, if I could do it again or turn back. We ended up with two broken hearts and I’d do it all over again.

What I took away from track 3, “Faith (Renewed),” is that the character is a non-believer trying to find faith from a source other than God. Am I on the right track there?

Pretty much right on the button… In fact, when I introduce that song when we play it live I talk about faith as a powerful thing; faith itself, and not necessarily in God or a higher power. Faith itself can be powerful. Faith in people, yourself, in belief, in whatever it is: in overcoming adversity. You don’t have the answer in front of you, and just persevering in the face of not having the answer in front of you is what faith is in my mind.

It seems the search – this time for simple peace of mind – continues on “Out On the Highway.” Talk a little bit about this song.

That song was inspired by a combination of two things. One was we were on a tour a year ago, summer 2014, of 20 some odd cities and it was a long haul, and we were out on the highway, so that was probably somewhere floating in my mind. But I was also struck by some folks that I know from West Virginia and that area who had had some tough times, you know, struggling to get ahead in life and s**t happens to them. And so I felt that kind of pain, of their pain, and just like, there’s gotta be a f***in’ better way than making a living like this. And so I’m just leaving. I’m leaving and I’m gonna find it, and that’s the search. There’s gotta be something better than this, something better than getting blown-up in a coal mine or having some dead-end job.

In the circa late 60s sounding “Stop Bringing Me Down” you appear to be trying to shed yourself of folks spreading negativity. Are you generally an optimist?

I don’t know. I’m definitely not a negative person; I’m always pretty upbeat – but realistic. I’ve had my share of people who, in many different aspects of life, who either just want to burst your bubble, or outright undermine you. So that’s my f**k you to them. And I was just in a kind of 60s psychedelic mood when I wrote it.

Another album highlight for me is the slinky blues rocker “Lord I Try” which reminds me of John Lennon’s “Well Well Well.” In general, how autobiographical is this album?

This album is all about the feeling that I experience in life (laughs). So it’s totally from me. I’d say there are characters, you know, and sometimes I just write outright, and a couple that are on there I’m just having fun. But usually it’s inspired by some kind of feeling that I’m trying to grapple with. And [as for] the John Lennon “Well Well Well,” you’re one of the few people that have picked up on that. If you hear it, like when I originally demoed it on my iPad, I was going for that barebones type of thing. I’m just pointing out that it’s interesting because if you heard the original demo that I made of it, it was clearly like John Lennon’s “Well Well Well.”

I mentioned that the tone of “Lord I Try” is a little slinky; I describe “Midnight Angel” as a little spooky, reminiscent of Bruce’s “Point Blank.” Who or what inspired this tune?

That’s another stream of consciousness type of thing that just poured out, literally, in just a few minutes, and I guess it’s about this person in this guy’s life, and together they’re in a relationship, she’s his midnight angel, maybe even a bit fantasy, and the relationship depends a little bit on the white lies that she tells and all this kind of stuff, but it works for them. Until one day it’s just gonna blow-up and inevitably end.

Let’s hit pause for a minute on going through the record and get a bit of background bio info on you. Going back further in time, what artists were you most drawn to when you were growing up in Brooklyn and Long Island?

Oh, obviously I would say all the classics. Anything from Elvis Presley to The Beatles to the Stones to Jimi Hendrix to Dylan to Springsteen to Nirvana and Guns N’ Roses to Black Sabbath, uh I could keep on going. You probably got the picture. David Bowie. I was definitely into the whole punk rock scene there for a while, from The Ramones to the New York Dolls, Blondie; stop me now!

When did you first decide to make your own music?

I started writing stuff the first time I took a music lesson because I found it pretty boring and tedious. My parents would yell at me for not practicing, cuz I would get sidetracked with just trying to do my own thing and make my own music.

What age were you when you first started?

I had to be about nine or 10. And then really writing songs started happening in my teens…I had my high school band and all that stuff.

I’d like to briefly visit your days as a lawyer. Are there any similarities between writing a closing argument and writing a song?

Exactly the same thing!

In what way?

Well for me, the way I went about it, I could never do a case unless it was something that had some kind of compelling human interest; something that’s important to more than just the people involved in the lawsuit or the case, or whatever. Music is about communicating a message on some visceral level, a feeling and connecting. Communicating and connecting. Doing a summation for a jury is about the same thing; communicating and connecting about some important message. I’ve had jurors crying and laughing, and that’s what you wanna do when you’re singing and playing music. You want people to have an emotional reaction. And it doesn’t happen every time you play a song or do a performance, and it doesn’t happen every time you do a summation. For me, the feeling, especially a live performance, is exactly the same, when I’m locked in and the audience is right there with us.

Speaking of the law, explain the significance of the title for “On Bradford Hill.”

So Bradford Hill is just sort of a tongue-in-cheek thing. In science there’s a guy called Bradford Hill, Professor Bradford Hill, and he has come up with these criteria to determine proof of something that causes something else. The idiots that are in the legal profession take this and apply it to law so that if it doesn’t meet the Bradford Hill criteria it’s not admissible if it’s something in science you’re trying to prove. And they always misinterpret it. Lawyers trying to figure out science is always a catastrophe. Anyways, so I just took the concept tongue-in-cheek, Bradford Hill, it’s a hill, it’s a place, where people go to find meaning in life. It’s a tongue-in-cheek play on words that most people don’t know unless they’ve ever heard of [Professor] Bradford Hill (laughs).

I’m curious about why you decided to seriously downshift the tempo for “On Bradford Hill” at around 3:50 in?

Anthony Resta, who’s the producer, he loved this song and the idea of it because he saw it as the search for proof of life out there in the universe and proof of a higher power. He’s always fascinated by science fiction and space travel. So he encouraged me with this idea, like, why don’t we just go for this different kind of thing, in a whole different direction, like pondering the universe.

So how does a boy from Brooklyn pen a great country rock number like “Over You?” To me it’s got the swagger of The Rolling Stones’ “Dead Flowers.”

Yeah, I guess that’s how it happened. I have all this stuff embedded in my DNA, so I think “Over You” was sort of like a “Dead Flowers” influenced type of thing. But I can write country songs all day long; I got a million of ‘em.

You mentioned the producer, Anthony Resta, a couple of times. I understand you had a very hand-in-glove working relationship with him. What was the most important ingredient he added to the process of recording this record?

Giving it more depth, texture, focus and polish.

If you were to record a duet with an artist outside of the genre of music for which you are known, who might that be and what song would you cover?

That would definitely be Frank Sinatra, and there’s a million songs of his, but just to take one I would say “That’s Life.” He’s one of those guys whose fame overshadowed their actual talent. He really was tremendously gifted and was a passionate artist, despite his own personal issues and reputation. Sinatra’s overall fame often diminished the simple fact that he was a passionate artist that was personable enough to touch people’s heart.

Okay, we’ve presented the evidence, now give me your best closing argument for why people should run out and buy your album Keepin’ Faith.

Well I would just say that these are songs about everyday life; the simple struggles of everyday life, the ups and the downs and the feelings that we have on a daily basis. I’m not trying to say anything profound or solve world peace. But if getting through the day and getting through life and trying to make sense of all of that stuff and the struggle of it is your thing, you might relate to the songs on this record. And if your thing is Americana and rhythm and blues inspired rock n’ roll, then this is an album that you should take a listen to. - All Access


Gary Douglas may have strayed a bit off the musician’s path for a while, picking up a law degree along the way, but he is a rock n roller through and through– and don’t you forget it. Making up for lost time, Douglas poured out heart and soul on a doozy of an album, Keepin’ Faith, released in spring of 2015. Blending rock with country, blues and even some Americana, Douglas and his band strive to make music that “kicks that chair out from under you, cranks up the volume, slams out a beat like punches to the gut and dredges its message from the deepest passions singers and listeners can bear.”

That’s why it’s fitting that his recent music video for “Out On The Highway,” premiering today, is cut from live footage of a performance he gave at New York City’s Rockwood Music Hall this past October. This gives the song a raw edge, filled to bursting with powerhouse vocals, from both Douglas and his backup singers. Interchanging solos on guitar and keys add a dash of spontaneity, well received by the swaying, cheering crowd. For being relatively new to the game, Douglas seems perfectly at ease and in command front and center.

You can check out Douglas and his burning hot band when they make their way back to Gotham on Wednesday, 1/13 at the Cutting Room’s Light Of Day Festival (click for tickets) and Saturday, 1/23 at the Bowery Electric (click for tickets).

Check out “Out On The Highway” below, and pick up a copy of Keepin’ Faith today. - Elmore Magazine


The Gary Douglas Band: The Perfect Combo
—by Rachael Ciccone, January 5, 2016

The combination of classic rock and country blues is assembled in the best way throughout NY-based band, The Gary Douglas Band’s, music. Their sophomore studio album, Keepin’ Faith, released in October, and depicts this genre blend in each of the 12 songs it offers. The album’s producer, Anthony Resta, worked with Elton John, Needtobreathe, and a variety of more notable bands, and provided an abundance of creative guidance in constructing this collection of songs. The Gary Douglas Band will be playing in Manhattan at The Cutting Room onJan. 13 and The Bowery Electric on Jan. 23. - THE AQUARIAN


On the strength of first single “To Be With You,” tracks from the New York City-based Gary Douglas Band’s 2015 album Keepin’ Faith have been added to dozens of radio stations around the country. With a sound that is part-Americana and part-Springsteen, The Gary Douglas Band is a guitar-focused group, with its frontman recently gigging alongside Yngwie Malmsteen, Gary Hoey and former Guns N’ Roses axeman Bumblefoot on the 28-city Guitar Gods tour. Their album Keepin’ Faith was made with acclaimed producer Anthony Resta, known for his work with Elton John, Guster and Perry Farrell.

Those looking to experience Gary and band in concert have two opportunities in January 2016. The first being as part of the Light Of Day benefit show at The Cutting Room (44 East 32nd St.) on Jan. 13 alongside Dramarama, Willie Nile and Max Weinberg.

Those seeking a headlining set from the group can catch such at The Bowery Electric (327 Bowery) on Jan. 23. Full-scale performances are planned for both, with guitarists Jeremy Goldsmith, keyboardist Scott Chasolen, bassist Dan Asher, drummer Stefano B, saxophonist Nick Biello and backing vocalists Clara Lofano and Yula Beeri in tow.

Per my Q&A with Gary for Downtown, early 2016 will also bring a new EP from the band, even though Yahoo Music premiered a live video for “Faith (Renewed)” just a few weeks ago. For more info on Gary and band, click on over to www.thegarydouglasband.com.

There have been a lot of famous artists with the last name Douglas. Other than Gary Douglas, who is your favorite?

Gary Douglas: Kind of a fun question. I’d have to pick Jack Douglas, the legendary record producer. I mean that’s my answer if it's a limited to people named Douglas. He has had a hand in so many of the all-time great records.

How did you come up the decision to name the band after you as opposed to being a solo artist?

G: It’s a band effort all the way. I bring the songs in and we all work on it. And we developed a distinct sound that represents a blend of all our styles.Though I run the show, it’s still a collaborative effort when it comes to arrangements and the whole feel and sound of the band. This is most definitely a band. Every member has an important role and makes an important contribution.

Do you primarily identify as an Americana artist? A country artist? Or do you have another way of describing your music?

G: Definitely say it’s Americana. Which in my mind is a very distinct genre and is timeless.

Is there a particular artist that inspired you to pick up a guitar for the first time?

G: Well really, it was more to do with the fact of my older brother had a guitar in the house and he looked pretty cool playing while I was stuck taking boring piano lessons. So I used to take his guitar when he wasn’t around and I taught myself how to play.

What is the best concert you’ve ever seen?

G: Every Bruce Springsteen show I’ve been to. The Allman Brothers, David Bowie at Radio City Music Hall…

With regards to your upcoming shows in New York, what’s to be expected? Does your band throw any covers into its live sets?

G: We do throw a couple of our own interpretations of some covers when we are playing longer shows. We will be doing a new one in the upcoming shows called “State Trooper.” It’s an obscure Springsteen tune that he recorded with just an acoustic guitar, and we’ve given it the rock ‘n’ roll treatment — while keeping true to the Americana genre — and it sounds amazing. It’s such a unique interpretation and sounds so great we are probably going to include on our next EP in early 2016.

Where was the first gig that you ever played in New York City?

G: Where else? The Bitter End.

Given how expensive New York City is, what is it that keeps you alive here while being an artist?

G: Fighting evil corporations.

What brought you to New York in the first place?

G: Born and raised.

Going beyond the music, is there something you wish more people knew about Gary Douglas?

G: Hard to answer because music so intertwined with what’s important to me. I mean, my family means everything to me and my friends. And helping people that are struggling.

When you’re not busy with your career, how do you usually spend your free time around time?

G: Family and friends. Good food and good times. Enjoying the company of good people.

Do you have a favorite album of 2015?

G: Well technically it’s 2014, but my last favorite, new album was Hozier.

Finally, Gary, any last words for the kids?

G: Music is magic — it seems to me it’s the only thing where there’s is no rational explanation as to why it is so good at conveying every human emotions and in such a beautiful way. And brings people together. Whether you play or just listen. And rock ‘n’ roll is king.

-by Darren Paltrowitz - Downtown Magazine


LIGHT OF DAY WINTERFEST- NYC 2016!
December 30, 2015 by Brooklyn Roads Team

With a goal of topping last year’s record-breaking half million dollars raised in its’ ongoing battle against Parkinson’s Disease, the Light of Day Foundation’s Winterfest expands to New York City on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at The Cutting Room in Manhattan.

The lineup for this concert includes Willie Nile, Dramarama ,The Weeklings , Joe D’Urso and Stone Caravan and The Gary Douglas Band.

Willie Nile is one of the few artists to have participated in a number of Light of Day events every year since the first one back in November of 2000. A portion of proceeds from his upcoming album, due in early 2016, will be donated to the Light of Day Foundation. Brooklyn Roads, a longtime supporter of the Light of Day Foundation, was thrilled that Willie and his bass player, Johnny Pisano, were the subjects of our first video and interview feature when we launched the new site design in the fall of 2015.

Dramarama is a Los Angeles based alternative rock band is fronted by singer-songwriter John Easdale, with original members Peter Wood (guitar), Mark Englert (guitar), along with longtime members Mike Davis (bass) and Tony Snow (drums).

The Weeklings are an Asbury Park based quartet that perform original Beatles inspired power pop as well as lesser known Beatles material with infectious passion and enthusiasm. The Weeklings are Glen Burtnik (Lefty), Bob Burger (Zeek), John Merjave (Rocky) and Dave Anthony Ramblin’ Dave) and have appeared and collaborated with many high profile national artists.

Joe D’Urso is an Americana/Jersey Shore/Rock & Roll songwriter, who also sits on the Board of Directors of the Light of Day Foundation. Brooklyn Roads profiled Joe after a recent performance for the Brooklyn Music Shop at the Prospect Range.

The seven piece Gary Douglas Band, comprised of New York veteran musicians, rounds out the lineup for this New York City installment of the 2016 Light of Day Winterfest.

General admission tickets are on sale now for $45.00. The doors open at 6 p.m. and show how time is 7 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit The Cutting Room website or call 212-691-1900. - Brooklyn Roads Team


January 13, 2016 at The Cutting Room in New York.

Honored to be playing this show in NYC.. to raise money and awareness of Parkinson’s disease. We will be joining Willie Nile & Band, Dramarama, Joe D’Urso & Stone Caravan and Gary Douglas Band
Doors:6pm
Show: 7pm
Tickets: $45-$75 -


Raised in New York but seeped in a rich blend of Americana, musician Gary Douglas has been working hard at his craft since his youth. He, along with his band, released a second studio album, Keepin’ Faith, in October which presents a diverse mix of classic rock, Americana, country, blues and folk.

Yahoo Music is excited to premiere the video for single “Faith (Renewed)” for fans to get a taste of his sonic blend. - YAHOO MUSIC


Already the 2016 Montauk Music Festival is compiling a line-up of diverse and talented musicians. Ken and I spent an evening in Manhattan at the Rockwood Music Hall checking out a CD release of one of our new performers for 2016, The Gary Douglas Band. A fifteen year home-owner in Montauk, Gary Douglas spends a lot of time with his wife and children enjoying all that Montauk and the east end has to offer. His band even performed at Stephen Talkhouse for the past two summers.

Rockwood Music Hall reminded me of an intimate old time music room, dimly lit and buzzing with anticipation for the music to start. As the band opened with “Faith” a single from their new album Keepin' Faith the room exploded with soulful sounds and the audience responded in kind. Their first single “To Be With You” was next. With the intimate blending of vocals and instrumentals, it’s no wonder this sax infused song is already being played on over 20 radio stations and is nominated for a first round Grammy pick for song of the year and best pop performance. Although I enjoyed each song, one of my favorites was the Blues tune “Every Time I Pray”. His voice captivated the audience with its soothing, gruff bluesy tones.

Gary has been described as a Blues Rocker – with a genre of Rhythm and Blues infused Rock and Roll. In his bio he’s described; musically, with his muscular guitar playing, emotive voice and anthemic lyrics, he’s absolutely his own heartland-style man. But, as with any great Rocker, you can tell this New Yorker has imbibed the vibe of some of the best musicians of our era. On the cut Lord I Try, from Douglas’s album Just Another Mile, the riff sticks with you like something by Keith Richards. The voice has the worldly weariness of Hunter. And the lyrics, which talk of a fruitless search for faith, sound like an all-night writing session between Lou Reed & Bruce Springsteen.

The new CD is off to a good start, and we feel fortunate to have experienced the official release. It’s obvious that the band has a good time playing together and enjoys getting the room involved with the tunes. We’re looking forward to sharing the talents of the Gary Douglas Band with Montauk at the MMF in May.

www.garydouglasband.com - Montauk Sun


Listen To Keepin' Faith On These Stations

CKUA (Edmonton, AB), KAOS (Olympia, WA), KAFM (Grand Junction, CO), KCSS (Turlock, CA), KDBB (Park Hills, MO), KFJC (Los Altos Hills, CA), KFSR (Fresno, CA), KMNO (Wailuku, HI), KPRT (Farmington. NM), KTYD (Santa Barbara, CA), KVNA (Flagstaff, AZ), KUWR (Laramie, WY), KVNF (Paonia, CO), KVMR (Nevada City, CA), KWMR (Bolinas, CA), KXCI (Tucson, AZ), KXRA (Alexandria, MN), KZMU (Moab, UT), KZZK (Quincy, IL), WBNY (Buffalo, NY), WBSD (Burlington, WI), WCLH (Wilkes-Barre, PA), WERU (Bangor, ME), WETS (Johnson City, TN), WFIV (Knoxville,TN), WHFC (Bel Air, MD), WHUS (Storrs, CT), WMHB (Waterville, ME), WMKY (Morehead, KY), WOCM (Ocean City, MD), WOUB (Athens, OH), WQTL (Tallahassee, FL), WRNC (Ashland, NC), WRRW (Williamsburg,VA), WRUR (Rochester, NY), WRUW (Cleveland, OH), WVIA (Scranton, PA), WYCE (Grand Rapids, MI), WYTX (Charlotte, NC), WZLO (Bangor, ME), WZXP (Bristol, VT). - Heavy Lenny Promotions


If you’ve been paying attention, almost everyone from 14 to 64, is tired of singers with headsets, hacky bands & songs that sound like they were written by an uninspired committee of five. On the other hand, hard-rockin’, ass-kickin’ Rock 'n Roll, from The Stones to Ian Hunter to Joan Jett, the folks with strong melodies, big beats & hooks that hang in your head for days, are attracting a remarkably wide range of people. Gary Douglas, who has the tunes, the attitude & a regal Rock and Roll heart, is one of those guys. Plus, he has great news for the fans he’s made on the radio & the road. Douglas & his band have a new album slated for October 9th.

Gary Douglas is an intriguing paradox. Musically, with his muscular guitar playing, emotive voice and anthemic lyrics, he’s absolutely his own heartland-style man. But, as with any great Rocker, you can tell this New Yorker has imbibed the vibe of some of the best musicians of our era. On the cut Lord I Try, from Douglas’s album Just Another Mile, the riff sticks with you like something by Keith Richards. The voice has the worldly weariness of Hunter. And the lyrics, which talk of a fruitless search for faith, sound like an all-night writing session between Lou Reed & Bruce Springsteen. Looking for a big riff, a song that all generations can relate to, a sentiment for all seasons? Then this tune by Gary Douglas and his tight, bangin’ band is for you. Douglas produced it, too. This is a man who knows how all the pieces should fit together and how this stuff should sound. Possibly better is It’s Rock ‘N’ Roll. It’s catchier than the flu, features a chiming hook the Byrds would nod at approvingly & has Rock attitude for days. It talks about the power of the music, sports an unforgettable twin-guitar solo and manages to name-check Gene Simmons, while sounding like Tom Petty just decided to sit in. But it’s all Gary Douglas. One listen and it not only stays with you, it makes you want to quit your job & start a band.

Gary Douglas & his band have the awesome firepower that comes with mastering your instrument. But that technique never gets in the way of the pure, sweaty soul, the Gospel of Rock 'N Roll that Douglas lays down. We know how cold this winter was. But that’s cool. Gary Douglas is about to release a new album and play it live - sooner than you know. But whatever the temperature, this means only one thing: thanks to Gary Douglas, this promises to be one hot, rockin’ fall.

This is one great album folks and do yourselves a huge favour and grab 'Keepin' Faith' come October 9th. - The Dog's Space


Douglas tells the Rockland County Times he has the attitude for hard rockin’ music and he and his seven piece band will be among a host of musicians at the June 27 and June 28 two day Rockland/Bergen Music Festival at the German Masonic Campgrounds in Tappan. In a press release Douglas is described as having a regal rock n’ roll heart and attitude. In fact, the word is that listening to Douglas and the band makes you want to quit your job and start your own band.

Douglas and his crew are currently workng on a new album with Paramount studios and the band’s publicist says that the newest work could be Douglas’ crowning achievement.

Pure, sweaty soul is how some critics describe Douglas’ music, calling it the gospel of rock. Douglas and his band, along with a host of musicians and performers including John Sebastian, Shawn Colvin, David Johansen, Garland Jeffries, Willie Nile, Steve Forbett, James Maddock and many, many more are scheduled for the Second Annual Rockland Bergen Music Festival being presented by Joe Durso.

Information and tickets at rocklandmusicfestival.com/performers.php. - Rockland County Times


Longtime Montauk resident Gary Douglas and his band are playing two shows in Amagansett on August 20. A stripped-down version of the band will play a set at the Innersleeve Records store—where they will be selling their vinyl EP Keepin’ Faith—then the full seven-piece band will head next door to rock The Stephen Talkhouse stage.

In the true spirit of rock n’ roll, Douglas says he’s railing against “singers with headsets, hacky bands and songs that sound like they were written by an uninspired committee of five.” Instead the guitarist/singer and his band are playing “hard-rockin’, ass-kickin’” tunes with strong melodies, big beats and hooks that hang in your head for days, Douglas says, drawing comparisons to The Rolling Stones, Joan Jett, Ian Hunter and other bastions of real rock music.

With his muscular guitar playing, emotive voice and anthemic lyrics, Douglas is his own man musically, but his influences are also deeply ingrained in the tunes he creates. In cuts like “Lord I Try,” from the band’s Just Another Mile album, the riffs have a Keith Richards vibe and staying power, while Douglas’ voice imparts a certain world-weariness, reminiscent of Ian Hunter. And the lyrics, which talk of a fruitless search for faith, feel like something written by Bruce Springsteen. These are songs with big riffs that should be relatable to multiple generations.

Douglas and his band are packing some awesome musical firepower and performing hard-charging, rhythm & blues-infused rock n’ roll with plenty of soul. In 2014 they performed at Talkhouse after a 22-city, five-week Guitar Gods 2014 tour with icons Gary Hoey, Bumblefoot and Yngwie Malmsteen. This year, the band is playing shows and selling their Keepin’ Faith preview EP, but they’ve also been working on a full length Keepin’ Faith album, due for release in October.

The Gary Douglas Band is playing an in-store show at Innersleeve Records in Amagansett (199 Main Street, 631-604-6248) at 6 p.m. on Thursday, August 20. The show at Stephen Talkhouse (161 Main Street, 631-267-3117) begins at 10 p.m. the same night.

Visit garydouglasband.com for more info. - Dan's Papers


"...Next to the stage, providing something a little different, was The Gary Douglas Band. Residing in NY, the band came together in 2012 combining a variety of styles including rock, Americana, blues, and folk. Coming out as a nine piece band, the members consist of Douglas (lead vocal/guitar), Alex Prol (lead guitar), Clifford Carter (keys), Scott Chasolen (keys), Lee Nadel (bass), Dan Asher (bass), Stefano Baldasseroni (drums), Clara Lofaro, and Sarah Wise (background vocals). Kicking out an irresistible groove the band played through a strong set of original country rock tunes. With a mix of blues guitar solos and heartfelt vocals The Gary Douglas Band provided a good mix of variety for the evening." - Cryptic Rock


ncludes the recently released "River Road" (available at all digital outlets). The track - joined by a lyric video, streaming now via www.garydouglasband.com - earned online acclaim upon its arrival earlier this year. "A blustering mix of soulful and melodic Americana, and gritty heartland rock," declared JamSphere.com , "it's exactly what you expect from one of the authentic practitioners of the genre. But amid the fist-pumping stadium anthem, you'll find the meditative mind of Douglas taking stock of real life issues that many of us have to face on a daily basis - unemployment, rent, mortgages - and the courage, love and hope it takes to not succumb to them. The Gary Douglas Band manages to balance introspection with propulsive rock n' roll, while intertwining a subtle political and social bent." "A high quality piece of songwriting and old school storytelling that keeps the flame of rock n' roll alive," hailed The Faulkner Review . "Gary Douglas and his cohorts kick up a musical storm that recalls the finest moments of Springsteen and acolytes of that artist will adore this band." "Roaring vocals, an exhilarating instrumental and powerful lyrics make 'River Road' a must-listen," wrote The Ratings Game, while Music Existence decreed "River Road" to be "an exceptional song...a fresh yet timeless American classic." -


The Gary Douglas Band - Nothing Ever Goes as Planned -


Gary Douglas and his band haven’t yet amassed a long discography to their credit, but their most recent album Keepin’ Faith did the work of a trio of albums in establishing The Gary Douglas Band as a major new force on the “roots rock” scene. He’s released two singles so far from Deep in the Water, the band’s full length follow up to Keepin’ Faith, and the newest single “Nothing Ever Goes as Planned” solidifies the promise of his forthcoming release. It avoids any of the boisterous Stones like swagger Douglas and his band mates conjure on other tracks in favor of a much more thoughtful and relevant reflection on modern American society. -


The single “River Road” is what got me hooked on the Gary Douglas Band, and the album from which it was spawned, Deep in the Water. Deep in the Water might as well be a greatest hits disc encapsulating every great country song that should have been released between 2008 and 2018 but never was, partly due to shrinking talent in the country scene, partly because no one with talent had the creative gumption to get it done. But the Gary Douglas Band isn’t letting us wait anymore. This October they’re releasing a musical tour de force with Deep in the Water and taking the world along with them. -


Deep In The Water is being self-released. The album was produced by Niko Bolas and co-produced by Darrell Brown. Nilo has worked on albums for Beth Hart and The Mavericks among others. The album was recorded in Nashville, New York and Ojai and Sherman Oaks, California. Gary wrote two of the songs and co-wrote the rest of the album.

Gary does the lead vocals on the album. He has an incredible lineup that plays on the album. Gary is joined by Paul Deakin and Raul Malo of The Mavericks. Paul is on drums and Raul plays acoustic and electric guitars. Jeff Kazee from Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes is on piano and B3 organ. Jay Weaver is on upright bass. He's recorded with The Mavericks, Big Daddy Weave and Dolly Parton among others. Josh Leo has wrote for, and produced, a who's who of country artists. He lends his talents to this album on electric and acoustic guitars. Jennifer Gunderman, who has recorded with Kris Kristofferson and toured with Sheryl Crow along with being a professor at Vanderbilt University, plays accordion on the album. Nick Biello plays saxophone on the album. His song arrangements have been performed by great such as Stevie Wonder and he has performed and recorded with numerous jazz artists. - Bruce Von Stiers


The Gary Douglas Band has just released their new single. A life relatable yet motivational song titled "Nothing Ever Goes As Planned." And if life hasn't shown you that yet, trust when I say it will. And when that lesson comes about, just press play on this new single and get motivated to find your away around broken plans and keep pushing forward for your initial goal. - Music Worth Mention


The Gary Douglas Band’s birth came when Douglas, a longtime and respected trial attorney in the New York City area, obeyed the inner tug of a musical muse that remained with him long after he gave up playing music in favor of a steadier career. Music simply clicks with some people, not in the makes you want to move sort of way, but rather snaps something into place in the interior lives of such people that everything seemingly falls into place and life’s possibilities are greater than ever before. Gary Douglas engages with music in such a way, connecting with artists like Bruce Springsteen because they speak to a vision of reality he shares with them. His own music reflects that and his band’s new single “Nothing Ever Goes as Planned” comes as close to the truth in musical form that you’ll hear from any act working today.

Douglas’ voice is deceptive, especially for newcomers. He handles the verses with smooth phrasing with a faint smoky sound, but he dials up the intensity for the chorus, especially its climatic moment. The lyrics don’t present any problems for Douglas as a singer and one of his key phrasing talents lies in the careful way he brings each line to life without ever stretching for effect. Backing vocals join Douglas’ voice during the chorus and there’s a palpable spirituality in the juxtaposition of voices that elevates the tune’s mood. It’s rather remarkable, considering the song’s words, that there’s such a bright, even hopeful, sound permeating the track. It helps make the song’s catalog of modern horrors much more palatable for listeners.



The musical arrangement is important to bringing that tone off for listeners. It’s a short song, not quite making it to three minutes long, but much of its success is due to Douglas’ intelligent choice to never overplay his hand; there’s a sparse, tasteful quality to the songwriting despite the passionate nature of the material. The slight stutter to the acoustic guitar is especially effective and positioned nicely within the mix and has a pleasing melodic jangle. “Nothing Ever Goes as Planned” opens with muted percussion, but its contribution quickly evolves and the rhythm section proves to be another critical factor in bringing the performance together. It gives the song a solid foundation for Douglas and his fellow musicians to build from.

The second single from his forthcoming album Deep in the Water expands on the promise heard with the first “River Road”. Gary Douglas’ songwriting is probing and emotionally affecting without neglecting the needed entertainment value. Keeping things on point is, undoubtedly, an important part of what makes this single so memorable, but Douglas works with musicians who clearly comprehend his musical aims and complement them with their own extensive skill sets. “Nothing Ever Goes as Planned” may take a dim view of our modern world, but there’s never any sense of despair suffocating the song. Instead, The Gary Douglas Band’s latest single encourages us to hold our heads high no matter what and, above all else, to keep singing along. -


Despite what you may have read or heard before, there really is no wrong way to make an album, regardless of what kind of album you’re trying to make. Every piece of music is, in essence, an experimental track from the time that it is first composed all the way to when it lands somewhere on the Billboard charts, and the concept of genres and categorization altogether are completely artificial and created by the music industry for marketing purposes. But while there is no wrong way to make an album, there is, in fact, a right way to make an album, and anyone curious about how to go about doing so should take a look at the Gary Douglas Band’s new record Deep in the Water, a supremely produced and well mastered sonic buffet of traditional country music running face first into contemporary pop/rock. Sparks fly and drums crash and Douglas and company trot through one slice of gilded Americana to the next, and though it sports some modest, down-home lyrics, Deep in the Water is the most ambitious record of 2018, and it will make a Gary Douglas fan out of anyone who comes in contact with it.

In songs like “Losing You,” it feels like Gary Douglas is singing directly to us, and not to an audience or even into a microphone. It’s just us and Gary alone with these thoughts that he can’t seem to escape no matter what he does or where he goes. These thoughts that weigh him down like a lead jacket; he’s unburdening himself by sharing them with us, like a friend confiding in another friend. Another artist might just have well tried the same tactic and come off as being overly pushy and lyrically demanding, but Douglas wisely uses the technique sparingly enough so that everything stays right at the same pace it was when we started. Self-control is the key to enjoyment in almost all things that you’ll encounter when wandering this planet of ours, and in itself, discipline is such an enormous tool in music that we often dismiss those who apply it well as simply skilled at repetition. That isn’t the case; you don’t teach the discipline that Gary Douglas has.
Nashville should be getting on high alert with Deep in the Water, not because of the fact that unintentionally the Gary Douglas Band is giving a little bit of life to country music’s dying brand, but because they’re ripping the rug out from under the seediest aspect of the city’s lore; commercialism. Deep in the Water is indie from its skin down to its bones, and Gary Douglas hasn’t just respected the ethical laws of the underground, he’s helping to see that they’re regularly and unforgivingly enforced.

His efforts should be universally applauded by everyone who enjoys what music can do for the world when it hasn’t been tainted by the leering eyes of greed. Deep in the Water is out this October just in time for the autumn touring season – I’d be on the lookout for the Gary Douglas Band to make their way onto the circuit again very soon. - Heather Savage


Gary Douglas è cresciuto nelle strade di Brooklyn accompagnato dalla colonna sonora Americana, Blues and Country: un mix di musica che contrasta la solita musica mainstream.

Questo tipo di musica ha dato a Douglas un impulso nei giorni della sua giovinezza. "Per me è diventata una religione, profonda e significativa. La musica mi ha dato un modo per incanalare i miei sentimenti, sia che li capissi o no. Ho sempre trovato uno sbocco per i sentimenti che non riuscivo a risolvere, capire o gestire suonando musica. Era indispensabile. "

Nonostante sia cresciuto, il fascino del rock non ha mai lasciato la parte di Douglas. Ha suonato in gruppi durante l'università, e poi è stato colpito da una realtà tutta sua. "Dovevo guadagnarmi da vivere." Così mise giù la chitarra e prese una laurea in legge, ma non perse mai lo spirito del rock 'n' roll. "Camminavo in campo con la tuta e i capelli lunghi sotto le spalle", ricorda. "I giudici mi odiavano perché odiavo l'autorità. Ero poco ortodosso e anticonvenzionale. "Mentre i suoi coetanei reprimevano l'emozione, trovò il fuoco per combattere nella propria.

Con il suo atteggiamento da attaccabrighe, ha costruito una carriera di successo come avvocato per la responsabilità del prodotto e per l'ambiente, sostenendo le società che non hanno tenuto in grande considerazione le conseguenze delle loro azioni. Nonostante il suo successo, mancava ancora qualcosa. Anche se lo spirito del rock non ha mai lasciato Douglas, sacrificare la propria musica per una carriera legale è avvenuta, anche a costo della sua felicità. Alla fine, decise che ne aveva avuto abbastanza.

Una chitarra è appesa alla parete di casa, aspettando pazientemente questo giorno. Ancora una volta assumendo il ruolo di musicista, Douglas riscoprì l'euforia che aveva perso in quel compromesso anni prima. In men che non si dica è tornato all'estasi di suonare e scrivere nuove canzoni, alimentate dalle dure verità della realtà che ha visto nella vita di tutti i giorni.
Gary Douglas è un combattente, lo è sempre stato. Dà voce a coloro che spesso rimangono inascoltati sia difendendo i "piccoli" contro le corporazioni in tribunale o attraverso i suoi testi incisivi.

L'album in uscita della Gary Douglas Band, Deep in the Water, non perde nulla del disco che ha colpito Douglas nel corso della sua vita. Frutto del successo di una causa ambientale, la traccia del titolo affronta i fallimenti aziendali del prendersi cura della terra mentre "Losing You" mostra un lato vulnerabile a cui tutti possono relazionarsi. Al centro di The Gary Douglas Band c'è la musica con cui Douglas è cresciuto ed è pronto a condividerla con chiunque abbia bisogno di sentirsi dire com'è. -


Discography

"Keepin' Faith" Album - 2015 (Oct 9)

"To Be With You" Single - 2015

"Keepin' Faith" EP - 2015 (Available on Vinyl)

"Just Another Mile" (Reissue) Album - 2015

"Just Another Mile" Album - 2014

"Just Another Mile" EP - 2014

Photos

Bio

Gary Douglas has long been waging battle with the forces of greed and injustice, both as rebel rocker and as a Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame attorney who spends each and every day fighting for workers rights and the victims of corporate greed. Now, with The Gary Douglas Band’s bracing new LP, DEEP IN THE WATER, he has crafted his most powerful statement thus far, a clarion call of passionate rock ‘n’ roll fueled by expertly crafted melodies, stadium-sized choruses, and Douglas’ uncompromising lyricism. Songs like “Nothing Ever Goes As Planned” and the forceful title track find the singer-songwriter-bandleader opening up his rousing American sound to better explore the social and emotional effects of politics and power on living, breathing people.


DEEP IN THE WATER fully catapults The Gary Douglas Band to the forefront of Americana and heartland rock 'n' roll. Produced and mixed by Niko Bolas (Neil Young, Warren Zevon) and co-produced by chart-topping Darrell Brown (Keith Urban, Radney Foster), DEEP IN THE WATER sees Gary Douglas backed by an all-star lineup including: Southside Johnny and his Asbury Jukes keyboardist Jeff Kazee, The Mavericks' Raul Malo and Paul Deakin, The Jayhawks' Jennifer Gunderman, guitarist Josh Leo, saxophonist Nicholas Biello, and a host of Nashville's finest session players. The NYC-based band has staked a claim in recent years as a truly stirring live Americana-rock group with national tours and supporting like-minded artists such as Donna the Buffalo, Paul Thorn, Los Lonely Boys, and Southside Johnny.

Band Members